Lesson Before Dying

ISBN-10: 0375702709
ISBN-13: 9780375702709
Edition: 1993
Authors: Ernest J. Gaines
List price: $14.00 Buy it from $1.99
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: From the author of A Gathering of Old Men and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman comes a deep and compassionate novel. A young man who returns to 1940s Cajun country to teach visits a black youth on death row for a crime he didn't commit.  More...

Used Starting from $9.47
New Starting from $12.89
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
You could win $10,000

Get an entry for every item you buy, rent, or sell.

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
History of Western Art Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
History of World Philosophies Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
American History Volume 1 Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
History of Western Music Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $14.00
Copyright year: 1993
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 9/28/1997
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 272
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.704
Language: English

From the author of A Gathering of Old Men and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman comes a deep and compassionate novel. A young man who returns to 1940s Cajun country to teach visits a black youth on death row for a crime he didn't commit. Together they come to understand the heroism of resisting.

Ernest James Gaines was born on January 15, 1933, on the River Lake Plantation, Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana. His 1993 novel, A Lesson Before Dying, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. Gaines has been a MacArthur Foundation fellow, awarded the National Humanities Medal, and inducted into the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Order of Arts and Letters) as a Chevalier. Although he was educated in California (at San Francisco State College and Stanford University), his fiction is dominated by images and characters drawn from rural Louisiana, where he was born and raised. Unquestionably the most recognizable, and probably the best, of Gaines's novels is The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1971), a fictional account of the long life of a black woman born a slave on a Louisiana plantation. Through the stories of the many fascinating people who touch Jane's life, Gaines presents not only a moving perspective on the struggles of African Americans but also a social history of the United States since the Civil War. It is a testimony to Gaines's skill as a writer and storyteller that many people believe Jane Pittman was a real person. Indeed, the novel is frequently misshelved in the biography section of bookstores. In 1993 Gaines also won the Dos Passos Prize and in 2000 he won the National Humanities Medal. Of Gaines's other works, Bloodline (1976), a collection of five short stories, stands out for its powerful portrayals of young men in search of self-respect and dignity.

A Lesson Before Dying
Leadtext: I WAS NOT THERE, yet I was there
No, I did not go to the trial, I did not hear the verdict, because I knew all the time what it would be
Still, I was there
I was there as much as anyone else was there
Either I sat behind my aunt and his godmother or I sat beside them
Both are large women, but his godmother is larger
She is of average height, five four, five five, but weighs nearly two hundred pounds.Once she and my aunt had found their places - two rows behind the table where he sat with his court - appointed attorney - his godmother became as immobile as a great stone or as one of our oak or cypress stumps
She never got up once to get water or go to the bathroom down in the basement
She just sat there staring at the boy's cleancropped head where he sat at the front table with his lawyer
Even after he had gone to await the jurors' verdict, her eyes remained in that one direction
She heard nothing said in the courtroom
Not by the prosecutor, not by the defense attorney, not by my aunt
(Oh, yes, she did hear one word - one word, for sure: "hog.") It was my aunt whose eyes followed the prosecutor as he moved from one side of the courtroom to the other, pounding his fist into the palm of his hand, pounding the table where his papers lay, pounding the rail that separated the jurors from the rest of the courtroom
It was my aunt who followed his every move, not his godmother
She was not even listening
She had gotten tired of listening
She knew, as we all knew, what the outcome would be
A white man had been killed during a robbery, and though two of the robbers had been killed on the spot, one had been captured, and he, too, would have to die
Though he told them no, he had nothing to do with it, that he was on his way to the White Rabbit Bar and Lounge when Brother and Bear drove up beside him and offered him a ride
After he got into the car, they asked him if he had any money
When he told them he didn't have a solitary dime, it was then that Brother and Bear started talking credit, saying that old Grop� should not mind crediting them a pint since he knew them well, and he knew that the grinding season was coming soon, and they would be able to pay him back then
The store was empty, except for the old storekeeper, Alcee Grop�, who sat on a stool behind the counter
He spoke first
He asked Jefferson about his godmother
Jefferson told him his nannan was all right
Old Grop� nodded his head
"You tell her for me I say hello," he told Jefferson
He looked at Brother and Bear
But he didn't like them
He didn't trust them
Jefferson could see that in his face
"Do for you boys?" he asked
"A bottle of that Apple White, there, Mr
Grop�," Bear said
Old Grop� got the bottle off the shelf, but he did not set it on the counter
He could see that the boys had already been drinking, and he became suspicious
"You boys got money?" he asked
Brother and Bear spread out all the money they had in their pockets on top of the counter
Old Grop� counted it with his eyes
"That's not enough," he said
"Come on, now, Mr
Grop�," they pleaded with him
"You know you go'n get your money soon as grinding start." "No," he said
"Money is slack everywhere
You bring the money, you get your wine." He turned to put the bottle back on the shelf
One of the boys, the one called Bear, started around the counter
"You, stop there," Grop� told him
"Go back." Bear had been drinking, and his eyes were glossy, he walked unsteadily, grinning all the time as he continued around the counter
"Go back," Grop� told him
"I mean, the last time now - go back." Bear continued
Grop� moved quickly toward the cash register, where he withdrew a revolver and started shooting
Soon there was shooting from another direction
When it was quiet again, Bear, Grop�, and Brother were all down on the floor, and only Jefferson was standing.He wanted to run, but he couldn't run
He couldn't even think
He didn't know where he was
He didn't know how he had gotten there
He couldn't remember ever getting into the car
He couldn't remember a thing he had done all day.He heard a voice calling
He thought the voice was coming from the liquor shelves
Then he realized that old Grop� was not dead, and that it was he who was calling
He made himself go to the end of the counter
He had to look across Bear to see the storekeeper
Both lay between the counter and the shelves of alcohol
Several bottles had been broken, and alcohol and blood covered their bodies as well as the floor
He stood there gaping at the old man slumped against the bottom shelf of gallons and half gallons of wine
He didn't know whether he should go to him or whether he should run out of there
The old man continued to call: "Boy? Boy? Boy?" Jefferson became frightened
The old man was still alive
He had seen him
He would tell on him
Now he started babbling
"It wasn't me
It wasn't me, Mr
Grop�
It was Brother and Bear
Brother shot you
It wasn't me
They made me come with them
You got to tell the law that, Mr
Grop�
You hear me, Mr
Grop�?"But he was talking to a dead man.Still he did not run
He didn't know what to do
He didn't believe that this had happened
Again he couldn't remember how he had gotten there
He didn't know whether he had come there with Brother and Bear, or whether he had walked in and seen all this after it happened
He looked from one dead body to the other
He didn't know whether he should call someone on the telephone or run
He had never dialed a telephone in his life, but he had seen other people use them
He didn't know what to do
He was standing by the liquor shelf, and suddenly he realized he needed a drink and needed it badly
He snatched a bottle off the shelf, wrung off the cap, and turned up the bottle, all in one continuous motion
The whiskey burned him like fire - his chest, his belly, even his nostrils
His eyes watered; he shook his head to clear his mind
Now he began to realize where he was
Now he began to realize fully what had happened
Now he knew he had to get out of there
He turned
He saw the money in the cash register, under the little wire clamps
He knew taking money was wrong
His nannan had told him never to steal
He didn't want to steal
But he didn't have a solitary dime in his pocket
And nobody was around, so who could say he stole it?
Surely not one of the dead men
He was halfway across the room, the money stuffed inside his jacket pocket, the half bottle of whiskey clutched in his hand, when two white men walked into the store
That was his story
The prosecutor's story was different
The prosecutor argued that Jefferson and the other two had gone there with the full intention of robbing the old man and then killing him so that he could not identify them
When the old man and the other two robbers were all dead, this one - it proved the kind of animal he really was - stuffed the money into his pockets and celebrated the event by drinking over their still-bleeding bodies
The defense argued that Jefferson was innocent of all charges except being at the wrong place at the wrong time
There was absolutely no proof that there had been a conspiracy between himself and the other two
The fact that Mr
Grop� shot only Brother and Bear was proof of Jefferson's innocence
Why did Mr. Grop� shoot one boy twice and never shoot at Jefferson once? Because Jefferson was merely an innocent bystander
He took the whiskey to calm his nerves, not to celebrate
He took the money out of hunger and plain stupidity."Gentlemen of the jury, look at this - this - this boy
I almost said man, but I can't say man
Oh, sure, he has reached the age of twenty-one, when we, civilized men, consider the male species has reached manhood, but would you call this - this - this a man? No, not I
I would call it a boy and a fool
A fool is not aware of right and wrong
A fool does what others tell him to do
A fool got into that automobile
A man with a modicum of intelligence would have seen that those racketeers meant no good
But not a fool
A fool got into that automobile
A fool rode to the grocery store
A fool stood by and watched this happen, not having the sense to run."Gentlemen of the jury, look at him - look at him - look at this
Do you see a man sitting here?
Do you see a man sitting here?
I ask you, I implore, look carefully - do you see a man sitting here?
Look at the shape of this skull, this face as flat as the palm of my hand - look deeply into those eyes
Do you see a modicum of intelligence?
Do you see anyone here who could plan a murder, a robbery, can plan - can plan - can plan anything?
A cornered animal to strike quickly out of fear, a trait inherited from his ancestors in the deepest jungle of blackest Africa - yes, yes, that he can do - but to plan?
To plan, gentlemen of the jury?
No, gentlemen, this skull here holds no plans
What you see here is a thing that acts on command
A thing to hold the handle of a plow, a thing to load your bales of cotton, a thing to dig your ditches, to chop your wood, to pull your corn
That is what you see here, but you do not see anything capable of planning a robbery or a murder
He does not even know the size of his clothes or his shoes
Ask him to name the months of the year
Ask him does Christmas come before or after the Fourth of July?
Mention the names of Keats, Byron, Scott, and see whether the eyes will show one moment of recognition
Ask him to describe a rose, to quote one passage from the Constitution or the Bill of Rights
Gentlemen of the jury, this man planned a robbery?
Oh, pardon me, pardon me, I surely did not mean to insult your intelligence by saying 'man' - would you please forgive me for committing such an error?"Gentlemen of the jury, who would be hurt if you took this life? Look back to that second row
Please look
I want all twelve of you honorable men to turn your heads and look back to that second row
What you see there has been everything to him - mama, grandmother, godmother - everything
Look at her, gentlemen of the jury, look at her well
Take this away from her, and she has no reason to go on living
We may see him as not much, but he's her reason for existence
Think on that, gentlemen, think on it."Gentlemen of the jury, be merciful
For God's sake, be merciful
He is innocent of all charges brought against him."But let us say he was not
Let us for a moment say he was not
What justice would there be to take this life? Justice, gentlemen? Why, I would just as soon put a hog in the electric chair as this."I thank you, gentlemen, from the bottom of my heart, for your kind patience
I have no more to say, except this: We must live with our own conscience
Each and every one of us must live with his own conscience."The jury retired, and it returned a verdict after lunch: guilty of robbery and murder in the first degree
The judge commended the twelve white men for reaching a quick and just verdict
This was Friday
He would pass sentence on Monday.Ten o'clock on Monday, Miss Emma and my aunt sat in the same seats they had occupied on Friday
Reverend Mose Ambrose, the pastor of their church, was with them
He and my aunt sat on either side of Miss Emma
The judge, a short, red-faced man with snow-white hair and thick black eyebrows, asked Jefferson if he had anything to say before the sentencing
My aunt said that Jefferson was looking down at the floor and shook his head
The judge told Jefferson that he had been found guilty of the charges brought against him, and that the judge saw no reason that he should not pay for the part he played in this horrible crime.Death by electrocution
The governor would set the date.� 1993, Ernest J
Gaines

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×