Race, Incarceration, and American Values

ISBN-10: 0262123118
ISBN-13: 9780262123112
Edition: 2008
List price: $15.95 Buy it from $4.94
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Description: The United States, home to five percent of the worlds' population, now houses twenty-five percent of the world's prison inmates. Our incarceration rate--at 714 per 100,000 residents and rising--is almost forty percent greater than our nearest  More...

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Book details

List price: $15.95
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 8/22/2008
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 96
Size: 4.25" wide x 7.25" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.550
Language: English

The United States, home to five percent of the worlds' population, now houses twenty-five percent of the world's prison inmates. Our incarceration rate--at 714 per 100,000 residents and rising--is almost forty percent greater than our nearest competitors (the Bahamas, Belarus, and Russia). More pointedly, it is 6.2 times the Canadian rate and 12.3 times the rate in Japan. Economist Glenn Loury argues that this extraordinary mass incarceration is not a response to rising crime rates or a proud success of social policy. Instead, it is the product of a generation-old collective decision to become a more punitive society. He connects this policy to our history of racial oppression, showing that the punitive turn in American politics and culture emerged in the post-civil rights years and has today become the main vehicle for the reproduction of racial hierarchies. Whatever the explanation, Loury agues, the uncontroversial fact is that changes in our criminal justice system since the 1970s have created a nether class of Americans--vastly disproportionately black and brown--with severely restricted rights and life chances. Moreover, conservatives and liberals agree that the growth in our prison population has long passed the point of diminishing returns. Stigmatizing and confining of a large segment of our population should be unacceptable to Americans. Loury's call to action makes all of us now responsible for ensuring that the policy changes. Praise for The Anatomy of Racial Inequality: "t;Intellectually rigorous and deeply thoughtful.... The Anatomy of Racial Inequalityis an incisive, erudite book by a major thinker."t; --Gerald Early, New York Times Book Review A Boston Review Book

Boston University professor Glenn Loury was educated at Northwestern University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Loury has taught at Harvard University, Northwestern University and the University of Michigan. He is currently on the commission for the National Academy of Science and was elected vice president of the American Economics Association in 1997. Loury has contributed writing to The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and National Review. He also is an editor for The New Republic. Loury's book "One by One, From the Inside Out: Essays and Reviews on Race and Responsibility in America," which won the 1996 American Book Award and the 1996 Christianity Today Award. He has also received a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Robert C. Post is Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law and Dean of Yale Law School.

Tommie Shelby is Professor of African and African American Studies and of Philosophy at Harvard University.

Race, Incarceration, and American Values
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Loic Wacquant
Tommie Shelby
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