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Newer Ideals of Peace

ISBN-10: 0252073452
ISBN-13: 9780252073458
Edition: 2005
List price: $18.00
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Description: In this her second book, Jane Addams moves beyond humanitarian appeals to sensibility and prudence, advancing a more aggressive, positive idea of peace as a dynamic social process emerging out of the poorer quarters of cosmopolitan cities. Her deep  More...

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Book details

List price: $18.00
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Publication date: 1/15/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 232
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.660

In this her second book, Jane Addams moves beyond humanitarian appeals to sensibility and prudence, advancing a more aggressive, positive idea of peace as a dynamic social process emerging out of the poorer quarters of cosmopolitan cities. Her deep analysis of relations among diverse groups in U.S. society, exemplified by inter-ethnic and labor relations in Chicago, draws widely useful lessons for both domestic and global peace, in an early formulation of todayrsquo;s "globalization from below." nbsp; In an unprecedented, revolutionary critique of the pervasive militarization of society, Addams applies her scathing pen to traditional advocates and philosophers of ldquo;negativerdquo; peace, founders of the U.S. constitution, militarists, bigots, imperialists, and theories of ldquo;democratic peacerdquo; and liberal capitalism. Instead she sees a slow, powerful emergence of forces from below--the poor, the despised, workers, women, ethnic and racial communities, oppressed groups at home and abroad--that would invent moral substitutes for war and gradually shape a just, peaceful, and varied social order. An extensive, in-depth introduction by Berenice Carroll and Clinton Fink provides historical context, analysis, and a reassessment of the theoretical and practical significance of Newer Ideals of Peace today.

Jane Addams was born Laura Jane Addams in Cedarville, Illinois, on September 6, 1860. She graduated from Rockford Female Seminary with the hope of attending medical school. Her father opposed her unconventional ambition and, in an attempt to redirect it, sent her to Europe. In London, Addams was moved by the work done at Toynbee Hall, a settlement house. Upon her return to the United States, she began her lifelong fight for the underprivileged, women, children laborers, and social reform. In the space of four years she received Yale University's first honorary doctorate awarded to a woman, published her first book, was the first woman president of the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, and was elected vice president of the National American Women Suffrage Association. In 1915 she became the first president of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. With Ellen G. Starr, Addams founded Hull House in Chicago, a renowned settlement house dedicated to serving the disadvantaged and the poor. Addams went on to author twelve books, including Twenty Years in Hull House, Newer Ideals of Peace, and Peace and Bread in Time of War. The latter title was written to protest the U.S.'s involvement in World War I and was based on Addams's experience assisting Herbert Hoover in sending relief supplies to women and children in enemy nations. Hospitalized following a heart attack in 1926, Addams could not accept in person the Nobel Peace Prize she was awarded in 1931. She was the first American woman to receive the honor. Addams died in 1935.

Berenice A. Carroll is Director of the Women's Studies Program and Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Professor Emerita at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her books and articles include Design for Total War: Arms and Economics in the Third Reich; Liberating Women's History: Theoretical and Critical Essays; "The Politics of `Originality': Women and the Class System of the Intellect"; and "Christine de Pizan and the Origins of Peace Theory."Hilda L Smith is Professor of History at the University of Cincinnati. She is author of Reason's Disciples: Seventeenth Century English Feminists, co-compiler with Susan Cardinale of Women and the Literature of the Seventeenth Century: An Annotated Bibliography Based on Wing's Short Title Catalogue and editor of Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition.

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