Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy, Revolution, and Society

ISBN-10: 0226805271
ISBN-13: 9780226805276
Edition: Reprint 
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Description: Alexis de Tocqueville possessed one of the most fertile sociological imaginations of the nineteenth century. For more than 120 years, his uncanny predictive insight has continued to fascinate thinkers, and his writings have continued to influence  More...

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Book details

List price: $41.00
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Publication date: 9/15/1982
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 402
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Alexis de Tocqueville possessed one of the most fertile sociological imaginations of the nineteenth century. For more than 120 years, his uncanny predictive insight has continued to fascinate thinkers, and his writings have continued to influence our interpretations of history and society. His analyses of many issues remain relevant to current social and political problems. In this volume John Stone and Stephen Mennell bring together for the first time selections from the full range of Tocqueville's writings, selections that illustrate the depth of his insight and analysis.

French writer and politician Alexis de Tocqueville was born in Verneuil to an aristocratic Norman family. He entered the bar in 1825 and became an assistant magistrate at Versailles. In 1831, he was sent to the United States to report on the prison system. This journey produced a book called On the Penitentiary System in the United States (1833), as well as a much more significant work called Democracy in America (1835--40), a treatise on American society and its political system. Active in French politics, Tocqueville also wrote Old Regime and the Revolution (1856), in which he argued that the Revolution of 1848 did not constitute a break with the past but merely accelerated a trend toward greater centralization of government. Tocqueville was an observant Catholic, and this has been cited as a reason why many of his insights, rather than being confined to a particular time and place, reach beyond to see a universality in all people everywhere.

Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Social Origins of Democracy The Democratic Character of Anglo-American Society The American System of Townships Political Effects of Administrative Decentralization in the United States The Distinctiveness of the American Federal Constitution The Relative Importance of Manners, Laws, and Physical Characteristics in the Maintenance of Democracy
The Political Structure of Democracy Political Activity in America Political Associations in the United States The Role of Secondary Institutions Freedom of the Press Political Functions of the Jury System Political Functions of Religion Political Functions of Education The Tyranny of the Majority
Social Relations under Democracy The Softening of Manners as Social Conditions became More Equal How Democracy Makes Social Encounters among the Americans Simple and Easy How Equality Divides the Americans into Numerous Small Social Circles Associations in American Civil Life How Democracy Affects the Relations of Masters and Servants Democracy and the Equality of the Sexes War and Democratic Armies
The Cultural Consequences of Democracy Philosophical Method among the Americans The Principal Source of Belief among Democratic Nations Why the Americans Are More Addicted to Practical Than to Theoretical Science The Spirit in Which the Americans Cultivate the Arts Literary Characteristics of Democratic Ages The Trade of Literature The Effect of Democracy on Language Characteristics of Historians in Democratic Ages
The Ancien R�gime and the Origins of the French Revolution The Nature of the Problem How, Though Its Objectives Were Political, the French Revolution Followed the Lines of a Religious Revolution, and Why This Was So What Did the French Revolution Accomplish? Why Feudalism Had Come to Be More Detested in France Than in Any Other Country Administrative Centralization under the Ancien R�gime How Paternal Government, as It Is Called Today, Had Been Practiced under the Ancien R�gime How in France, More Than in Any Other European Country, the Provinces Had Come under the Domination of the Capital City How France Had Become the Country in Which Men Were Most Like Each Other How, Though in Many Respects Similar, the French Were Split Up into Small, Isolated, Self-regarding Groups How the Lot of the French Peasant Was Sometimes Worse in the Eighteenth Century Than It Had Been in the Thirteenth
The Dynamics of Revolution How, Around the Middle of the Eighteenth Century, Men of Letters Took the Lead in Politics How the Desire for Reforms Took Precedence over the Desire for Freedom How Prosperity Hastened the Outbreak of the Revolution How the Spirit of Revolt was Promoted by Well-intentioned Efforts to Improve the People's Lot How, Given These Facts, the Revolution Was a Foregone Conclusion From the Revolution to Napoleon
The Revolution of 1848 and Its Aftermath The Jury Monarchy: Triumph of the Bourgeoisie The End of the July Monarchy Causes of the February Revolution The Class Character of Revolutions Blunders of the Revolutionaries Louis Napoleon's Coup of 2 December 1851
Social Control: Individualism, Alienation, and Deviance Social control under the Ancien R�gime Social Control in the New England Townships Respect for Law in the United States Anomie in France on the Eve of Revolution Individualism in Democratic Countries That Aristocracy May Be Engendered by Industry A Manufacturing City—Manchester Social Conditions in Ireland Prisons: A Gresham's Law of Crime The Effects of Solitary Confinement The Rehabilitation of Prisoners The Effects of Degrading Punishments How Much Crime Is There? Criminal Statistics: Problems of International Comparison
Race Relations, Slavery, and Colonialism Tocqueville versus Gobineau Ethnic Stratification in Ireland Race Relations in America The American Indians Blacks in America Slavery in the French Colonies Colonialism

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