Unequal under Law Race in the War on Drugs

ISBN-10: 0226684628
ISBN-13: 9780226684628
Edition: 2007
List price: $28.00 Buy it from $13.00
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Description: Race is clearly a factor in government efforts to control dangerous drugs, but the precise ways that race affects drug laws remain difficult to pinpoint. Illuminating this elusive relationship,Unequal under Lawlays out how decades of both manifest  More...

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Book details

List price: $28.00
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Publication date: 10/1/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 193
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Race is clearly a factor in government efforts to control dangerous drugs, but the precise ways that race affects drug laws remain difficult to pinpoint. Illuminating this elusive relationship,Unequal under Lawlays out how decades of both manifest and latent racism helped shape a punitive U.S. drug policy whose onerous impact on racial minorities has been willfully ignored by Congress and the courts. Doris Marie Provine’s engaging analysis traces the history of race in anti-drug efforts from the temperance movement of the early 1900s to the crack scare of the late twentieth century, showing how campaigns to criminalize drug use have always conjured images of feared minorities. Explaining how alarm over a threatening black drug trade fueled support in the 1980s for a mandatory minimum sentencing scheme of unprecedented severity, Provine contends that while our drug laws may no longer be racist by design, they remain racistindesign. Moreover, their racial origins have long been ignored by every branch of government. This dangerous denial threatens our constitutional guarantee of equal protection of law and mutes a much-needed national discussion about institutionalized racism—a discussion thatUnequal under Lawpromises to initiate.

Acknowledgments and Dedication
Introduction
Racial Discrimination in the Eyes of the Law
Race in America's First War on Drugs
Negro Cocaine Fiends, Mexican Marijuana Smokers, and Chinese Opium Addicts: The Drug Menace in Racial Relief
Congress on Crack: How Race-Neutral Language Hides Racial Meaning
The Racial Impact of the War on Drugs: How Government Coped
Racial Justice: The Courts Consider Sentencing Disparities
Epilogue
Notes
References
Index

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