Human Condition

ISBN-10: 0226025985
ISBN-13: 9780226025988
Edition: 2nd 1998
List price: $19.00 Buy it from $7.98
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Description: A work of striking originality bursting with unexpected insights, The Human Condition is in many respects more relevant now than when it first appeared in 1958. In her study of the state of modern humanity, Hannah Arendt considers humankind from the  More...

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Book details

List price: $19.00
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 1998
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Publication date: 12/1/1998
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 370
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.100

A work of striking originality bursting with unexpected insights, The Human Condition is in many respects more relevant now than when it first appeared in 1958. In her study of the state of modern humanity, Hannah Arendt considers humankind from the perspective of the actions of which it is capable. The problems Arendt identified then--diminishing human agency and political freedom, the paradox that as human powers increase through technological and humanistic inquiry, we are less equipped to control the consequences of our actions--continue to confront us today. This new edition, published to coincide with the fortieth anniversary of its original publication, contains an improved and expanded index and a new introduction by noted Arendt scholar Margaret Canovan which incisively analyzes the book's argument and examines its present relevance. A classic in political and social theory, The Human Condition is a work that has proved both timeless and perpetually timely. Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was one of the leading social theorists in the United States. Her Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy and Love and Saint Augustine are also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Born in Hanover, Germany, Hannah Arendt received her doctorate from Heidelberg University in 1928. A victim of naziism, she fled Germany in 1933 for France, where she helped with the resettlement of Jewish children in Palestine. In 1941, she emigrated to the United States. Ten years later she became an American citizen. Arendt held numerous positions in her new country---research director of the Conference on Jewish Relations, chief editor of Schocken Books, and executive director of Jewish Cultural Reconstruction in New York City. A visiting professor at several universities, including the University of California, Columbia, and the University of Chicago, and university professor on the graduate faculty of the New School for Social Research, in 1959 she became the first woman appointed to a full professorship at Princeton. She also won a number of grants and fellowships. In 1967 she received the Sigmund Freud Prize of the German Akademie fur Sprache und Dichtung for her fine scholarly writing. Arendt was well equipped to write her superb The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951) which David Riesman called "an achievement in historiography." In his view, "such an experience in understanding our times as this book provides is itself a social force not to be underestimated." Arendt's study of Adolf Eichmann at his trial---Eichmann in Jerusalem (1963)---part of which appeared originally in The New Yorker, was a painfully searching investigation into what made the Nazi persecutor tick. In it, she states that the trial of this Nazi illustrates the "banality of evil." In 1968, she published Men in Dark Times, which includes essays on Hermann Broch, Walter Benjamin, and Bertolt Brecht (see Vol. 2), as well as an interesting characterization of Pope John XXIII.

Introduction
Prologue
The Human Condition
Vita Activa and the Human Condition
The Term Vita Activa
Eternity versus Immortality
The Public and the Private Realm
Man: A Social or a Political Animal
The Polis and the Household
The Rise of the Social
The Public Realm: The Common
The Private Realm: Property
The Social and the Private
The Location of Human Activities
Labor
"The Labour of Our Body and the Work of Our Hands"
The Thing-Character of the World
Labor and Life
Labor and Fertility
The Privacy of Property and Wealth
The Instruments of Work and the Division of Labor
A Consumers' Society
Work
The Durability of the World
Reification
Instrumentality and Animal Laborans
Instrumentality and Homo Faber
The Exchange Market
The Permanence of the World and the Work of Art V. Action
The Disclosure of the Agent in Speech and Action
The Web of Relationships and the Enacted Stories
The Frailty of Human Affairs
The Greek Solution
Power and the Space of Appearance
Homo Faber and the Space of Appearance
The Labor Movement
The Traditional Substitution of Making for Acting
The Process Character of Action
Irreversibility and the Power To Forgive
Unpredictability and the Power of Promise
The Vita Activa and the Modern Age
World Alienation
The Discovery of the Archimedean Point
Universal versus Natural Science
The Rise of the Cartesian Doubt
Introspection and the Loss of Common Sense
Thought and the Modern World View
The Reversal of Contemplation and Action
The Reversal within the Vita Activa and the Victory of Homo Faber
The Defeat of Homo Faber and the Principle of Happiness
Life as the Highest Good
The Victory of the Animal Laborans
Acknowledgments
Index

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