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Imaginative Writing The Elements of Craft

ISBN-10: 0205750354
ISBN-13: 9780205750351
Edition: 3rd 2011
Authors: Janet Burroway
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Description: The core organizing principle of Imaginative Writing remains the same, which is that students in a multigenre course can benefit from playing with various writing techniques before they settle into a particular form. Much, if not most, of the advice  More...

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Book details

List price: $64.40
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Pearson Education
Publication date: 1/3/2010
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 416
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.50" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.452
Language: English

The core organizing principle of Imaginative Writing remains the same, which is that students in a multigenre course can benefit from playing with various writing techniques before they settle into a particular form. Much, if not most, of the advice given to students is relevant to any sort of writing and to most of the genres: The need for significant detail, for example, applies equally to narrative scene, poetic line, and theatrical dialogue; voice is a concept that applies to a character, a narrator, a memoir, a lyric persona, and so forth. My expectation is that by discussing techniques and offering exercises that let students experiment with those techniques before they commit to a formal project will make the instruction less threatening and encourage a sense of adventure. Beginning this way will also make it possible to illustrate the extent to which all writing is imaginative (as well as autobiographical) and that different genres share similar sources and build on similar skills. I have taken fiction and poetry as givens in a multigenre course. I have personally been convinced of drama's usefulness in developing a writer's facility (with characterization, dialogue, plot, pace, symbol). I have also wanted to acknowledge the growing popularity of creative nonfiction, the continuity of imaginative writing with the essay form students have inevitably studied, and the fact that emerging writers may find it easiest to begin with the material of their own lives. The book is organized so that, roughly, the first five weeks of a semester will cover five areas of imaginative technique (image, voice, character, setting, and story), the sixth the processes of development and revision, with two weeks each devoted to creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. Each chapter begins with a graphic or photographic image accompanied by a "Warm-up" prompt, which may be assigned in class or as a journal entry or replaced by one of the instructor's invention. Each of the technique chapters proceeds with a discussion of that technique, including illustrations from more than one genre (some invented and some taken from established writers); "Try This" exercises linked to particular aspects of the topic; then complete selections in the various genres. Like the "Warm-up" features, the "Try This" exercises can be used as in-class practice, assigned for journal entries, or left for the students to choose from. I think it's important, at least sometimes, to discuss resulting pieces in class, in order to get students used to a nonjudgmental discussion of roughs and written play. (This neutral way of workshopping is described at the end of the first chapter, "Invitation to the Writer.") Further comments and exercises among the selections at the end of each chapter link the readings to the techniques discussed and suggest briefly there are no questions aimed at literary interpretation how to read the selections for what can be taken away from them and made part of a repertoire of skills. But, of course, all the selections illustrate many things, and they can be assigned in any order or quantity that suits the individual instructor. The third edition, at the request of several reviewers, also contains development ideas at the end of each technique chapter, to aid those teachers who encourage students to be thinking toward a finished piece.

Janet Burrowayis the author of eight novels, includingThe BuzzardsandRaw Silk; two best-selling textbooks,Writing FictionandImaginative Writing; and the forthcoming memoirLosing Tim. She is also the author of numerous plays, short stories, poetry collections, and children's books. She is Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor Emerita at Florida State University and divides her time between Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and Chicago.

Indicate selections new to this edition
Invitation to the writer
You ...
And writing ...
And reading. .
And this book ...
And your journal ...
Journal Excerpts
Ayelet Waldeman***
Billy Collins ***
Cris Mazza ***
Patricia Henley***
Philip Graham***
A word about your workshop ...
The Elements of Craft
Image
Image and Imagination
Concrete, Significant Details
Figures of Speech
Readings
Creative Nonfiction
Annie Dillard
FromHeaven and Earth in Jest
David Sedaris
What I Learned***
Fiction
Nadine Gordimer
The Diamond Mine
Poems
Roger Bonair-Agard
American history looks for light--;a prayer for the survival of Barak Obama***
Billy Collins
Snow Day
Yusef Komunyakaa
Facing It
Drama
Don Nigro
Come into the Garden, Maud***
Voice
Your Voice
Persona
Character Voice
Point of View
Readings
Creative Nonfiction
Alice Walker
Beauty: When the Other Dancer is the Self
Warren J. Bowe
Guns for Teachers***
Calvin Trillin
Rock Threat Subsides***
Fiction
Thomas McGuane
Cowboy***
Jorge Luis Borges
The Book of Sand***
Poems
William Trowbridge
Kong Looks Back on His Tryout with the Bears
Sian B. Griffiths
Fistful***
Matt Bondurant
The Pathos of Charles Schultz***
Barbara Hamby
Ode to American English***
Drama
Jane Martin
French Fries
Character
As Desire
As Image
As Voice
As Action
As Thought
As Presented by the Author
As Conflict
Stock and Flat Characters
Readings
Creative Nonfiction
Stuart Dybek
Thread***
Lois-Ann Yamanaka
JohnJohn�s World***
Fiction
Alice Monroe
Prue***
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World***
Poems
Theodore Roethke
I Knew a Woman
Carole Simmons Oles
Stonecarver
Allen Ginsberg
To Aunt Rose
Elizabeth Jennings
One Flesh
Ted Kooser
Tattoo***
Drama
Alan Bennett
Bed Among the Lentils***
Setting
As the World
As a Camera
As Mood and Symbol
As Action
Readings
Creative Nonfiction
Joan Didion
At the Dam
Paul Theroux
The Slow Train to Kandy***
Fiction
Donald Barthelme
The School
Angela Carter
The Werewolf***
Poems
Sherman Alexie
At Navajo Monument Valley Tribal School
Heather McHugh
Earthmoving Malediction
Philip Appleman
Nobody Dies in the Spring***
Yusef Komunyakaa
Nude Interrogation
Drama
David Ives
The Philadelphia
Story
As a Journey
As a Power Struggle
As Connection and Disconnection
Readings
Creative Nonfiction
Patricia Hampl
Red Sky in the Morning
Fiction
David Foster Wallace
Incarnations of Burned Children***
Naguib Mahfouz
Half a Day***
Poems
Robert Hass
A Story About the Body
Albert Goldbarth
Columbine High School/Littleton, CO
Ellen Bryant Voigt
Short Story
Maxine Kumin
Woodchucks
Li - Young Lee
The Hammock
Drama
Michael Golamco
Heartbreaker***
Development And Revision
Developing a Draft
Structuring
Research
Revision
Editing
The Workshop
Examples
Elizabeth Bishop: First and Final Drafts of One Art
Patty Seyburn: Anatomy of Disorder ***
Janet Burroway: The Opening ofIndian Dancer: A Revision Narrative
Mark Vinz: The Penitent ***
Rita Mae Reese: A History of Glass ***
The Genres
Creative Nonfiction
The Essay and Creative Nonfiction
Memoir and the Personal Essay
Techniques of Creative Nonfiction
Fact and Truth
Readings
Gayle Pemberton
Do He Have Your Number, Mr. Jeffrey?
Margaret Atwood
The Female Body
S. L. Wisenberg
Margot�s Diary***
Fiction
Poetry
Basic Prosody
Line Editing

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