Reading/Writing Connections in the K-2 Classroom Find the Clarity and Then Blur the Lines

ISBN-10: 0205412777
ISBN-13: 9780205412778
Edition: 2006
List price: $47.60 Buy it from $4.14
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Description: Reading/Writing Connections in the K-2 Classroom demonstrates how through careful, explicit assessing, planning and teaching every student can understand the relationship between reading and writing. The text is filled with practical classroom  More...

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Book details

List price: $47.60
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/30/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 240
Size: 7.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.792
Language: English

Reading/Writing Connections in the K-2 Classroom demonstrates how through careful, explicit assessing, planning and teaching every student can understand the relationship between reading and writing. The text is filled with practical classroom strategies based on both theory and research. Focused on the goal of understanding the relationship between reading and writing, the text demonstrates how to move students between the two to become more skillful readers and writers. In three parts, the text explores the essential understandings needed to use the reading/writing connection; demonstrates how planning helps to use the reading/writing connection; and outlines teaching strategies to use the connection to strengthen your everyday encounters with students. Assessment is integrated into each chapter, providing a clear image of what it looks like to assess in the service of student learning. Practical ways to integrate phonemic awareness, phonics, word study and spelling into planning and teaching reading and writing are incorporated throughout. Word study is integrated into every chapter to ensure a systematic approach to the topic.

Leah Mermelstein is an internationally recognized literacy consultant who specializes in K-5 Reading and Writing Workshop. She is the President and CEO of Read-Write-Connect, INC. She is also the author of Reading/Writing Connections in the K-2 Classroom, (Allyn & Bacon), Don't Forget to Share (Heinemann) and the co-author of Launching the Writing Workshop (with Lucy Calkins) (Heinemann). She recently wrote an article about the power of Write Aloud, which can be found here. She also blogs at bestwritingconsultant.com. For the past 13 years, she has worked as a literacy consultant first, at Teachers College Reading and Writing Project with Lucy Calkins and now independently. She works with schools, districts, educational organizations, as well as universities to help teachers, coaches, and principals grow in their understanding of how to teach reading and writing to elementary students. While working with schools, she utilizes many methods of staff development such as demonstration, coaching, study groups, and institutes to name just a few. Her passions include weeklong summer institutes, keynote speeches, writing with teachers, as well as working collaboratively with districts and other organizations to pinpoint strengths and needs.

Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
BUILDING
Powerful Relationships
Introduce Engaging Tools
Emphasize How Students Treat One Another
Get To Know Your Students
Let Your Students Get To Know You
Start With Strength
For Further Study
Find the Clarity. . .
How Are Reading And Writing The Same?
Both reading and writing are purposeful activities
Both reading and writing are a process
Readers and writers use similar sources of information (cueing systems)
How Are Reading And Writing Different?
Writers express text for a purpose. Readers access text for a purpose
Writers always produce a product. Readers sometimes produce a product
Writing is a slower process. Reading is a quicker process
Writers must choose their topic. Readers must read about the topic that the writer chose
Writers choose their own structures. Readers are introduced to new structures
Writers go from sound to print. Readers go from print to sound
For Further Study
. . .And Then Blur the Lines
What Common Thinking Strategies Do Reading And Writing Share?
Readers and writers make decisions independently
Readers and writers activate relevant prior knowledge
Readers and writers determine importance
Readers and writers infer
Readers and writers envision
Readers and writers synthesize
Readers and writers ask questions of themselves and the writers and readers of their texts
Readers and writers monitor their reading and writing processes
Readers and writers activate their knowledge of letters and sounds
How Can I Use This Information?
For Further Study
Planning
Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing
How Does Speaking Connect To Writing?
How Does Speaking Connect To Reading?
How Does Listening Connect To Reading?
How Does Listening Connect To Writing?
Supporting Speaking And Listening Throughout Your Day
Choice time
Sharing sessions
Informal conversations
Reading And Writing Partnerships: A Powerful Structure
Launching partnerships
For Further Study
The Components of Balanced Literacy
What Are The Components Of Balanced Literacy?
What Does Balanced Literacy Actually Mean?
Looking At Components That Connect
Shared Writing: Highlighting meaning and structure sources of information
Read-Aloud: Highlighting meaning and structure sources of information
Interactive Writing: Highlighting visual sources of information
Shared Reading: Highlighting visual sources of information
Reading Workshop and Writing Workshop: Putting it all together
Using Assessment To Plan The Components Of Balanced Literacy
How Many Times Per Week Should I Do Each Component?
For Further Study
Units of Study
What Is A Unit Of Study?
Planning Reading And Writing Units Of Study
Emergent literacy Units of Study
Revision Units of Study in reading
Series books Units of Study
Nonfiction Units of Study
Rereading Units of Study
Immersion: Letting Reading Complement Writing
Immersion Lesson 1: Teaching students to notice the structures within texts
Immersion Lesson 2: Teaching students how to internalize the structures within texts
Immersion Lesson 3: Teaching students how to look at books to get new topic ideas
Immersion Lesson 4: Teaching students how to study one particular text structure
Immersion Lesson 5: Teaching students how to produce these structures through talking
Immersion Lesson 6: Teaching students how to produce these structures while writing
Planning Reading And Writing Units Of Study Side By Side
Plan clear reading and writing goals for both Units of Study
Plan to teach reading and writing thinking strategies at similar times
Plan the order of your reading and writing minilessons
For Further Study
Yearly Curriculum
What Is A Curriculum Calendar?
General Principles For Planning Curriculums
Curriculum calendars should have some genre Units of Study and some non-genre
Units of Study
Planning yearlong curriculums and assessing your students should be simultaneous
Curriculum calendars should be used as guides and should be revised and fine-tuned when necessary
Curriculum calendars should have between eight and twelve studies. Each Unit of Study should last from three to five weeks
Units of Study should build on one another
Mapping Reading And Writing Curriculums Together 96
Connect reading and writing curriculums by genre
Connect reading and writing curriculums by strategies
Connect reading and writing curriculums by process
For Further Study
TEACHING
Crafting Your Teaching
Listen To Your Students
Structure Your Teaching In Consistent Ways
Connect the known to the unknown
Have one clear and brief teaching point
Ensure that both you and your students are active
Teachers Teach Using The Qualities Of Good Writing And The Common
Thinking Strategies Across Reading And Writing
Teachers Teach The Same Concept Over Time Across Reading And Writing
Teachers Assess And Reflect Upon The Effectiveness Of Their Teaching
For Further Study
Minilessons
The Purpose Of Your Minilessons Must Be Clear To Your Students
The Structure Of Your Minilessons Should Be Consistent
The connection
The teach
The active engagement
The link
Connecting The Reading Minilesson To The Writing Minilesson
Just tell the students how the two minilessons connect
Retell a previous reading minilesson
Use the same or similar language across minilessons
Use materials from the reading minilesson in your writing minilesson
Connecting The Writing Minilesson To The Reading Minilesson
Extend Minilessons Across Time And Across Subject Areas
Teaching minilessons across time in the Writing Workshop
Teaching minilessons across time in the Reading Workshop
Should The Writing Minilesson Or The Reading Minilesson Come First?
How Can I Create Useful Charts That Document Reading And Writing Minilessons?
For Further Study
Conferences
Structure Of A Conference: Research, Decide, And Teach 133
Research
Decide
Teach
Types Of Conferences
Content conference
Strategy conference
Coaching conference
Conferring Across Reading And Writing
Angela: Strong writer/not as strong reader
Tan: Strong reader/not as strong writer
Tynia: Similar needs across reading and writing
For Further Study
Small Group Work
What Are The Benefits Of Small Group Work?
The Story Begins: Assessing Writers
The Story Continues: Forming Groups
Deciding On Methods Of Teaching
Teaching Small Groups
Small groups should teach a strategy that some but not all students need
Small group instruction should be structured in ways similar to your minilessons
Blur The Lines: Moving Small Groups Between Writing And Reading
Continuing with Group 3: Small group instruction in both writing and reading
Continuing with Group 6: Small group instruction in both writing and reading
For Further Study
Final Thoughts
Blur The Lines In Your Methods And Structures Of Teaching
Blur The Lines In Your Planning And Your Assessments
Blur The Lines In Your Strengths
Blur The Lines In Your Materials
Blur The Lines In Your Professional Reading
Appendixes
Recommended Professional Literature
Transcript Of Rehearsal And Revision In Reading
Strategies To Teach Meaning, Structure, And Adding Sources Of Information
Thinking Strategies That Readers And Writers Use
Planning Sheet For The Components Of Balanced Literacy
Planning A Unit Of Study
Planning Reading And Writing Units Of Study
Planning A Curriculum Calendar
Sample Curriculum Calendars
Transcripts Of A Connected Reading And Writing Minilesson
Conferring With Students Across Reading And Writing
Small Group Work Planning Sheets
References
Index

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