War and Imperialism in Republican Rome 327-70 B. C.

ISBN-10: 0198148666
ISBN-13: 9780198148661
Edition: 1979
List price: $105.00
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Description: Between 327 and 70 B.C. the Romans expanded their empire throughout the Mediterranean world. This highly original study looks at Roman attitudes and behavior that lay behind their quest for power. How did Romans respond to warfare, year after year?  More...

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Book details

List price: $105.00
Copyright year: 1979
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/1/1985
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 310
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Between 327 and 70 B.C. the Romans expanded their empire throughout the Mediterranean world. This highly original study looks at Roman attitudes and behavior that lay behind their quest for power. How did Romans respond to warfare, year after year? How important were the material gains of military success--land, slaves, and other riches--commonly supposed to have been merely an incidental result? What value is there in the claim of the contemporary historian Polybius that the Romans were driven by a greater and greater ambition to expand their empire? The author answers these questions within an analytic framework, and comes to an interpretation of Roman imperialism that differs sharply from the conventional ones.

William V. Harris is Shepherd Professor of History at Columbia University and Director of the Center for the Ancient Mediterranean.

Roman attitudes towards war
Economic motives for war and expansion
Expansion as a Roman aim
Annexation
Imperialism and Self-Defence
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