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Symbols, Selves, and Social Reality A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Social Psychology and Sociology

ISBN-10: 0195385667
ISBN-13: 9780195385663
Edition: 3rd 2010
List price: $59.95
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Description: The classroom is a dynamic, interactive environment in which students are continually evaluating, questioning, debating, and in turn, shaping social reality. Symbols, Selves, and Social Reality: A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Social  More...

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Book details

List price: $59.95
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 2010
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 3/25/2009
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 320
Size: 7.50" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.232
Language: English

The classroom is a dynamic, interactive environment in which students are continually evaluating, questioning, debating, and in turn, shaping social reality. Symbols, Selves, and Social Reality: A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Social Psychology and Sociology, Third Edition, provides students with a succinct, engaging, and affordable introduction to symbolic interactionism, the perspective that social reality is created, negotiated, and changed through the process of social interaction. Focusing on how elements of race and gender affect identity, authors Kent L. Sandstrom, Daniel D. Martin, and Gary Alan Fine use interesting, relevant real-world examples to discuss the personal significance of symbolic interactionism, its expanding theoretical scope, and its relationship to other prominent perspectives in sociology and social psychology. They skillfully cover empirical research topics that are inherently interesting to students, such as the dynamics of self-development, impression management, identity transformation, gender play, rumor transmission, and collective action. Thoroughly revised and updated in the third edition, this best-selling book now offers additional group assignments and activities at the end of each chapter in order to encourage student participation. Featuring updated case studies throughout, this edition also moves the section on theoretical perspectives to the beginning of the text, thereby providing students with a more thorough conceptual framework from the outset. Rich in pedagogical tools--including end-of-chapter summaries, key points and concepts, glossaries, readings lists, and discussion questions--Symbols, Selves, and Social Reality: A Symbolic Interactionist Approach to Social Psychology and Sociology, Third Edition, effectively demonstrates the tremendous power people have in determining social reality. Ideal for courses in symbolic interaction, individual and society, and social psychology, this unique text helps students understand how symbolic interactionism works, both in theory and in practice.

Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
The Meaning of Symbolic Interactionism
The Origins and Development of Symbolic Interactionism
Pragmatism and Sociology: The Contributions of George Herbert Mead
The Emergence of Symbolic Interactionism
Guiding Assumptions of the Symbolic Interactionist Perspective
How Is Interactionism Relevant and Beneficial to You?
Understanding Yourself and Your Choices
Understanding Joint Action
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
The Interactionist Toolkit: Methods, Strategies, and Relevant Perspectives
Methodological Traditions and Practices
Changing Directions in Interactionist Ethnography
Alternatives to Ethnography: The Iowa School and Conventional Scientific Methods
Related Social Psychological Perspectives
Dramaturgical Theory
Exchange Theory
Social Cognition Theory and Cognitive Sociology
Ethnomethodology
Emerging Voices and Perspectives Within Interactionism
Feminism
Conflict Theory
Postmodernism
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
People As Symbol Makers and Users: Language and the Creation of Reality
Creating and Transforming Reality
Sensation
Conceptualization and Categorization
Symbols, Signs, and Meanings
The Importance of Symbols
Naming "Reality" and Creating Meaningful Objects
Language, Naming, and the Construction of Reality
The Necessity of Language
Language, Naming, and Our Constructions of Others
Language, Naming, and the Construction of 'Inner' Reality: Emotional Experience
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
Socialization: The Creation of Meaning and Identity
Self-Development and the Stages of Socialization
The Preparatory Stage
The Play Stage
The Game Stage
Refinements of Mead's Theory of Socialization and Self-Development
Socialization and the Creation of Gender Identity
Creating Gender Identity in Early Childhood
Re-creating Gender Identity: Preadolescent Culture and Play
Boys and Girls Together: Learning and Maintaining Gender Boundaries
Socialization as an Ongoing Process: Turning Points in Identity
Passage to Adulthood
Turning Points and Epiphanies: The Case of HIV/AIDS
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
The Nature and Significance of the Self
What Is the Self?
The Self as Social Process
The Self as Social Structure
The Self-Concept: Its Structure and Contents
Self-Esteem and Its Sources: Beyond the Looking-Glass Self
The Impact of the Self-Concept
The Self as Dramatic Effect
Staging the Self in Everyday Life
Regions of Self-Presentation
The Self as Situated Identity
Beyond Goffman: The Drama of Self Versus the Experience of Self
The Experience of Self in Postmodern Society
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
Role Taking, Role Making, and the Coordination of Action
Defining Situations and Their Reality
Roles, Role Taking, and Role Making
Role Taking
Role Making
The Coordination of Social Behavior: Aligning Actions
Aligning Actions and Motive Talk
Emotions and the Coordination of Behavior
Emotions and Role Attachments: Role Embracement Versus Role Distance
Power, Constraint, and the Coordination of Behavior
Relationships, Power, and Constraint
The Characteristics of Asymmetrical Relationships
Social Life as a Negotiated Order
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
The Politics of Social Reality: Constructing and Negotiating Deviance
What Is Deviance?
The Absolutist View
The Relativist View
Labeling Theory and the Social Construction of Deviance
The Banning Process: Moral Entrepreneurs and the Making of Deviance
The Detection Process: Seeing Deviance and Deviants
The Attribution Process: Imputing Motives and Negotiating Identities
The Reaction Process: Sanctioning and Its Effects
Challenging and Transforming Deviant Labels: Tertiary Deviance
Limitations and Extensions of Labeling Theory
The Construction of Social Problems
The Media and the Construction of Terrorism
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
Collective Behavior and Social Movements
Collective Behavior
Riots
Rumors
Panics
Social Movements
How Do Social Movements Emerge, and Why Do People Join Them?
Strategies and Bases of Movement Recruitment
Ideology, Identity, and Commitment
Emerging Directions in Interactionist Analysis of Social Movements
Frame Analysis and Alignment
The Culture of Social Movements
Conclusions
Summary
Glossary of Key Terms
Questions for Reflection or Assignment
Suggested Readings for Further Study
Author Index
Subject Index

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