Blown to Bits Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness after the Digital Explosion

ISBN-10: 0137135599
ISBN-13: 9780137135592
Edition: 2008
List price: $30.95 Buy it from $4.45
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Description: Wherever you gohellip;whatever you say, write, photograph, or buyhellip;whatever prescriptions you take, or ATM withdrawals you makehellip;you are generating information. That information can be captured, digitized, retrieved, and copied anywhere on  More...

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Book details

List price: $30.95
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Publication date: 6/6/2008
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 384
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.540
Language: English

Wherever you gohellip;whatever you say, write, photograph, or buyhellip;whatever prescriptions you take, or ATM withdrawals you makehellip;you are generating information. That information can be captured, digitized, retrieved, and copied anywhere on Earth, instantly. Sophisticated computers can increasingly uncover meaning in those digital tracesunderstanding, anticipating, and influencingyou as never before. Is this utopia? Or the dawning of a1984/Brave New Worldhorror world? Whatever you call it, itrsquo;s happening. What kind of world are we creating? What will it be like to live there?Blown to Bitsoffers powerful and controversial answers to these questionsand give you the knowledge you need to help shape your own digital future,notlet others do it for you. Building on their pioneering joint MIT/Harvard course, the authors reveal how the digital revolution is changingeverything, in ways that are stunning even the most informed experts. Yoursquo;ll discover ten paradoxical truths about digital dataand learn how those truths are overturning centuries-old assumptions about privacy, identity, and personal control. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; Yoursquo;ll view the indelible digital footprints yoursquo;re making when you search Googlehellip;send emails and text messageshellip;write Microsoft Word documentshellip;download MP3shellip;make cellphone callshellip;post blog entrieshellip;pay highway tollshellip;use your supermarket discount card. And yoursquo;ll see how otherscouldbe following those footprints, in ways you never thought about, and might not like. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; Writing in plain English, the authors illuminate the myriad implications of the digital revolution, answering the questions yoursquo;ve wondered aboutoroughtto wonder about.Who owns all that data about you? What do they owe you? How private is your medical information? Is it possible to send a truly secure message? Who can you trust for accurate information when traditional media is replaced by thousands of unfiltered Internet sources? nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; Along the way, they reveal the decisions governments and corporations are makingright nowthat will shape your futurehellip;and show how to have your say in those decisions. Because you have anenormousstake in the outcome.We all do. How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Your World More Profoundly Than You Ever Imagined nbsp; nbsp;nbsp; Whorsquo;s watching you, what do they know about you, and what will they do with that knowledge? nbsp;nbsp; Is it time to say goodbyeforeverto privacy and personal identity? nbsp;nbsp; What kind of world are we creatingand what will it be like to live there? nbsp; informit.com/ph www.bitsbook.com nbsp; Preface nbsp; Chapter 1: Digital Explosion: Why Is It Happening, and What Is at Stake? Chapter 2: Ghosts in the Machine: Secrets and Surprises of Electronic Documents Chapter 3: Needles in the Haystack: Google and Other Brokers in the Bits Bazaar Chapter 4: Secret Bits: How Codes Became Unbreakable Chapter 5: Nak

Harold (Hal) Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a Fellow of the IEEE. He holds an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a Ph.D. degree in mathematics from MIT. In 1992, Abelson was designated as one of MIT's six inaugural MacVicar Faculty Fellows, in recognition of his significant and sustained contributions to teaching and undergraduate education. Abelson was recipient in 1992 of the Bose Award (MIT's School of Engineering teaching award). Abelson is also the winner of the 1995 Taylor L. Booth Education Award given by IEEE Computer Society, cited for his continued contributions to the pedagogy and teaching of introductory computer science. He is co-director of the MIT-Microsoft iCampus Research Alliance in Eductional Technology, co-chair of the MIT Council on Educational Technology, and serves on the steering committee of the HP-MIT Alliance. In these capacities, he played key roles in fostering MIT institutional educational technology initiatives such MIT OpenCourseWare and DSpace. He also consults to HP Laboratories in the area of digital information systems. Abelson has a broad interest in information technology and policy, and developed and teaches the MIT course Ethics and Law on the Electronic Frontier. He is a founding director of Creative Commons and Public Knowledge, and he was a founding director of the Free Software Foundation. Together, these three organizations are devoted to strengthing our intellectual commons. Abelson has a longstanding interest in using computation as a conceptual framework in teaching. He directed the first implementation of Logo for the Apple Computer, which made the language widely available on personal computers beginning in 1981; and published a widely selling book on Logo in 1982. His book Turtle Geometry, written with Andrea diSessa in 1981, presented a computational approach to geometry has been cited as "the first step in a revolutionary change in the entire teaching/learning process."

Preface
Digital Explosion: Why Is It Happening, and What Is at Stake?
The Explosion of Bits, and Everything Else
The Koans of Bits
Good and Ill, Promise and Peril
Naked in the Sunlight: Privacy Lost, Privacy Abandoned
1984 Is Here, and We Like It
Footprints and Fingerprints
Why We Lost Our Privacy, or Gave It Away
Little Brother Is Watching
Big Brother, Abroad and in the U.S.
Technology Change and Lifestyle Change
Beyond Privacy
Ghosts in the Machine: Secrets and Surprises of Electronic Documents
What You See Is Not What the Computer Knows
Representation, Reality, and Illusion
Hiding Information in Images
The Scary Secrets of Old Disks
Needles in the Haystack: Google and Other Brokers in the Bits Bazaar
Found After Seventy Years
The Library and the Bazaar
The Fall of Hierarchy
It Matters How It Works
Who Pays, and for What?
Search Is Power
You Searched for WHAT? Tracking Searches
Regulating or Replacing the Brokers
Secret Bits: How Codes Became Unbreakable
Encryption in the Hands of Terrorists, and Everyone Else
Historical Cryptography
Lessons for the Internet Age
Secrecy Changes Forever
Cryptography for Everyone
Cryptography Unsettled
Balance Toppled: Who Owns the Bits?
Automated Crimes-Automated Justice
NET Act Makes Sharing a Crime
The Peer-to-Peer Upheaval
Sharing Goes Decentralized
Authorized Use Only
Forbidden Technology
Copyright Koyaanisqatsi: Life Out of Balance
The Limits of Property
You Can't Say That on the Internet: Guarding the Frontiers of Digital Expression
Do You Know Where Your Child Is on the Web Tonight?
Metaphors for Something Unlike Anything Else
Publisher or Distributor?
Neither Liberty nor Security
The Nastiest Place on Earth
The Most Participatory Form of Mass Speech
Protecting Good Samaritans-and a Few Bad Ones
Laws of Unintended Consequences
Can the Internet Be Like a Magazine Store?
Let Your Fingers Do the Stalking
Like an Annoying Telephone Call?
Digital Protection, Digital Censorship-and Self-Censorship
Bits in the Air: Old Metaphors, New Technologies, and Free Speech
Censoring the President
How Broadcasting Became Regulated
The Path to Spectrum Deregulation
What Does the Future Hold for Radio?
Conclusion: After the Explosion
Bits Lighting Up the World
A Few Bits in Conclusion
The Internet as System and Spirit
The Internet as a Communication System
The Internet Spirit
Endnotes
Index

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