New Mcgraw-Hill Handbook

ISBN-10: 0073252158

ISBN-13: 9780073252155

Edition: 2007

List price: $65.31
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Description: This is a comprehensive composition handbook designed for class use as well as reference. It equips students to use writing to learn, connect writing to thinking and reading, apply practical strategies to specific assignments and use digital design as a tool for presenting their work.

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Book details

List price: $65.31
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 984
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.25" long x 1.75" tall
Weight: 2.838
Language: English

Elaine P. Maimon is President of Governors State University in the south suburbs of Chicago, where she is also Professor of English. Previously she was Chancellor of the University of Alaska Anchorage, Provost (Chief Campus Officer) at Arizona State University West, and Vice President of Arizona State University as a whole. In the 1970s, she initiated and then directed the Beaver College writing-across-the-curriculum program, one of the first WAC programs in the nation. A founding Executive Board member of the National Council of Writing Program Administrators (WPA), she has directed national institutes to improve the teaching of writing and to disseminate the principles of writing across the curriculum. With a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania, where she later helped to create the Writing Across the University (WATU) program, she has also taught and served as an academic administrator at Haverford College, Brown University, and Queens College.

Janice Haney Peritz is an Associate Professor of English who has taught college writing for more than thirty years, first at Stanford University, where she received her PhD in 1978, and then at the University of Texas at Austin; Beaver College; and Queens College, City University of New York. From 1989 to 2002, she directed the Composition Program at Queens College, where in 1996, she also initiated the college’s writing-across-the-curriculum program and the English Department’s involvement with the Epiphany Project and cyber-composition. She also worked with a group of CUNY colleagues to develop The Write Site, an online learning center, and more recently directed the CUNY Honors College at Queens College for three years. Currently, she is back in the English Department doing what she loves most: research, writing, and full-time classroom teaching of writing, literature, and culture.

Kathleen Blake Yancey is the Kellogg W. Hunt Professor of English and Director of the Graduate Program in Rhetoric and Composition at Florida State University. Past President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators (WPA) and Past Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), she is President of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). In addition, she co-directs the Inter/National Coalition on Electronic Portfolio Research. She has directed several institutes focused on electronic portfolios and on service learning and reflection, and with her colleagues in English Education, she is working on developing a program in new literacies. Previously, she has taught at UNC Charlotte and at Clemson University, where she directed the Pearce Center for Professional Communication and created the Class of 1941 Studio for Student Communication, both of which are dedicated to supporting communication across the curriculum.Contact Information: Kathleen Blake Yancey The Florida State University Department of English 224 Williams Building Tallahassee, FL 32306-1580 Phone: 850 645 6896 kyancey@english.fsu.edu

Part One: Writing and Designing Papers Chapter 1: Learning Across the Curriculum 1a. Use Writing to Learn as You Learn to Write 1b. Explore Ways of Learning in a multimedia world 1c. Use strategies for learning when English is your second language. Chapter 2: Understanding Assignments 2a. Recognize that writing is a process. 2b. Find an appropriate topic. 2c. Be clear about the purpose of your assignment. 2d. Use the appropriate genre. 2e. Ask questions about your audience. 2f. Determine the appropriate tone. 2g. Meet early to discuss coauthored projects. 2h. Gather the tools you need to get started. Chapter 3: Planning and Shaping the Whole Essay 3a. Explore your ideas. 3b. Decide on a thesis. 3c. Plan a structure that suits your assignment. 3d. Consider using visuals. Chapter 4: Drafting Paragraphs and Thinking about Visuals 4a. Use online tools for drafting. 4b. Write focused paragraphs. 4c. Write paragraphs that have a clear organization. 4d. Develop ideas and use visuals strategically. 4e. Integrate visuals effectively. 4f. Craft an introduction that establishes your purpose. 4g. Conclude by answering "so what?" Chapter 5: Revising and Editing 5a. Get comments from readers. 5b. Use online tools for revising. 5c. Focus on the purpose of your writing. 5d. Make sure you have a strong thesis. 5e. Review the structure of your paper as a whole. 5f. Revise your essay for paragraph development, paragraph unity, and coherence. 5g. Revise visuals. 5h. Edit sentences. 5i. Proofread carefully before you turn in your paper. 5j. Use resources available on your campus, on the Internet, and in your community. 5k. Learn from one student’s revisions. Chapter 6: Designing and Proofreading Documents and Visuals 6a. Consider audience and purpose when making design decisions. 6b. Use the toolbars available in your word-processing program. 6c. Think intentionally about design. 6d. Compile a print or electronic portfolio that presents your work to your advantage. Part Two: Common Assignments Across the Curriculum Chapter 7: Reading, Thinking, Writing: the Critical Connection 7a. Recognize that critical reading is a process. 7b. Preview the text or visual. 7c. Read and record your initial impressions. 7d. Reread using annotation and summary to analyze and interpret. 7e. Synthesize your observations in a critical response paper. Chapter 8:Informative Reports 8a. Understand the assignment. 8b. Approach writing an informative report as a process. 8c. Know how to write an informative report in the social sciences. 8d. Know how to write reviews of the literature. 8e. Know how to write informative papers in the sciences. 8f. Know how to write lab reports. 8g. Informative reports in the humanities. Chapter 9: Interpretive Analyses and Writing about Literature 9a. Understand the assignment. 9b. Approach writing an interpretive analysis as a process. 9c. Learn to write interpretive papers in the humanities. 9d. Write a literary interpretation of a poem. 9e. Write a literary interpretation of a work of fiction. 9f. Write a literary interpretation of a play. 9g. Learn to write interpretive papers in the social sciences. 9h. Know how to write case studies 9i. Learn to write interpretive papers in the sciences. Chapter 10: Arguments 10a. Understand the assignment. 10b. Learn how to evaluate an argument. 10c. Approach writing your own argument as a process. 10d. Arguments in the social sciences. 10e. Arguments in the humanities. 10f. Arguments in the sciences. Chapter 11: Personal essays, Lab Reports, and Case Studies 11a. Understand the assignment. 11b. Approach writing a personal essay as a process. Chapter 12: Essay Exams 12a. Prepare to take an essay exam. 12b. Learn strategies for answering essay exams. Chapter 13: Oral Reports and Presentations 13a. Plan and shape your oral presentation. 13b. Draft your presentation with the rhetorical situation in mind. 13c. Prepare for your presentation. Chapter 14: Multimedia Writing 14a. Learn about the tools for creating multimedia texts. 14b. Combine text and image with a word processing program to analyze images. 14c. Use a word processing program to create a hypertext essay. 14d. Use presentation software to create multimedia presentations. 14e. Create a web site. 14f. Create and interact with weblogs. Part Three: Researching Chapter 15: Understanding Research 15a. Understand the purpose of primary and secondary research. 15b. Recognize the connection between research and college writing. 15c. Choose and interesting research question for critical inquiry. 15d. Understanding the research assignment. 15e. Create a research plan. Chapter 16: Finding and Managing Print and Online Sources 16a. Use the library in person and online. 16b. Consult various kinds of sources. 16c. Understand keywords and keyword searches. 16d. Use print and online reference works for general information. 16e. Use print indexes and online databases to find journal articles and other periodicals. 16f. Use search engines and subject directories to find sources on the internet. 16g. Use your library’s online catalog or card catalog to find books. 16h. Take advantage of printed and online government documents. 16i. Explore online communication. Chapter 17: Finding and Designing Effective Visuals 17a. Find quantitative data and display it visually. 17b. Search for appropriate images in online collections, with an internet search engine, or in books and journals and other print sources. Chapter 18: Evaluating Sources 18a. Question print sources. 18b. Question Internet sources. 18c. Evaluate a source’s arguments. Chapter 19: Doing Research in the Archive, Field, and Lab 19a. Adhere to ethical principles when doing primary research. 19b. Prepare yourself before undertaking archival research. 19c. Plan your field research carefully. 19d. Keep a notebook when doing lab research. Chapter 20: Plagiarism, Copyright, and Intellectual Property 20a. Learn how plagiarism relates to copyright and intellectual property. 20b. Avoid plagiarism. 20c. Use copyrighted materials fairly. Chapter 21: Working with Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism 21a. Maintain a working bibliography. 21b. Take notes on your sources. 21c. Integrating quotations, paraphrases, and summaries properly and effectively. 21d. Synthesis: Take stock of what you have learned. Chapter 22: Writing the Paper 22a. Plan and draft your paper. 22b. Revise your draft. 22c. Document your sources. 22d. Present and publish your work. Chapter 23: Discipline-Specific Resources in the Library and on the Internet Part Four: Documenting Across the Curriculum Chapter 24: MLA Documentation Style 24a. The elements of MLA documentation style 24b. MLA style: In-text citations 24c. MLA Style: List of works Cited 24d. MLA style: Explanatory notes and acknowledgments 24e. MLA style: Paper Format 24f. Student paper in MLA style Chapter 25: APA Documentation Style 25a. the elements of APA documentation style 25b. APA style: In-text citations 25c. APA style: References 25d. APA style: Paper format 25e Student paper in APA style Chapter 26: Chicago and CSE Documentation Styles CHICAGO DOCUMENTATION STYLE 26a. Chicago style: In-text citations and notes 26b. Chicago style: Bibliography 26c. Sample Chicago-style notes and bibliography entries 26d. Sample from a student paper in Chicago style CSE DOCUMENTATION STYLES 26e. CSE name-year style: In-text citations 26f
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