Taking Sides Clashing Views in Criminal Justice

ISBN-10: 007282817X
ISBN-13: 9780072828177
Edition: 2006
List price: $67.33 Buy it from $20.03 Rent it from $17.18
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Description: This debate-style reader introduces students to current controversies in the field of criminal justice. The readings are written by scholars and experts in the field and reflect a variety of viewpoints presented in a pro/con format. Topics include:  More...

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Book details

List price: $67.33
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Publication date: 12/14/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 512
Size: 5.75" wide x 9.00" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.760
Language: English

This debate-style reader introduces students to current controversies in the field of criminal justice. The readings are written by scholars and experts in the field and reflect a variety of viewpoints presented in a pro/con format. Topics include: gun control, continued criminalization of drug use, the Miranda ruling, police lineups, plea bargaining, jury nullification, the three strikes rule, and prisoner rights.

Preface
Introduction
Systemic Issues
Are U.S. Crime Problems a Result of Our Failure to Get Tough on Crime?
Yes: from Thinking About Crime (First Vintage Books Edition, 1985)
No: from The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison: Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice, 7th ed. (Pearson, 2004)
Does the United States Have a Right to Torture Suspected Terrorists?
Yes: from "The Lesser of Two Evils? An Argument for Judicially Sanctioned Torture in a Post-9/11 World," Thomas Jefferson Law Review (Spring 2004)
No: from "Leading by Example? U.S. Interrogation of Prisoners in the War on Terror," Criminal Justice Ethics (Winter 2004)
Should Serious Sex Offenders Be Castrated?
Yes: from "The Case for Castration," Texas Monthly (May 1992)
No: from "Castration as an Alternative to Incarceration: An Impotent Approach to the Punishmnent of Sex Offenders," The Northern Illinois University Law Review (Fall 1994)
Will Strict Gun Control Laws Reduce the Number of Homicides in the United States?
Yes: from "Firearms, Violence, and the Potential Impact of Firearms Control," The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics (Spring 2004)
No: from "The Production of Criminal Violence in America: Is Strict Gun Control the Solution?" The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics (Spring 2004)
Legal Issues
Should the United States Abolish the Exclusionary Rule of Evidence in Criminal Cases?
Yes: from "Against Exclusion (Except to Protect Truth or Prevent Privacy Violations)," Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy (Winter 1997)
No: from "In Defense of the Search and Seizure Exclusionary Rule," Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy (Winter 2003)
Is "Black Rage" a Legitimate Defense in Criminal Proceedings?
Yes: from Black Rage Confronts the Law (NYU Press, 1997)
No: from The Abuse Excuse: And Other Cop-Outs, Sob Stories, and Evasions of Responsibility (Little, Brown and Company, 1994)
Should U.S. Courts Abandon the Miranda Rule?
Yes: from "Miranda's 'Negligible' Effect on Law Enforcement: Some Skeptical Observations," Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy (Winter 1997)
No: from "Bashing Miranda Is Unjustified-and Harmful," Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy (Winter 1997)
Should a Judge Be Permitted to Admit Evidence About an Alleged Rape Victim's History as a Prostitute?
Yes: from Opinion, Commonwealth v. Richard Harris, Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts (March 24, 2005)
No: from Dissenting Opinion, Commonwealth v. Richard Harris, Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts (March 24, 2005)
Processional Issues
Should the United States Abolish Plea Bargaining in Criminal Cases?
Yes: from "Abolishing Plea Bargaining: An End to the Same Old Song and Dance," American Journal of Criminal Law (Summer 1999)
No: from "Should We Really Ban Plea Bargaining? The Core Concerns of Plea Bargaining Critics," Emory Law Journal (Spring 1998)
Should the United States Abolish the Juvenile Court Systems?
Yes: from "Abolish the Juvenile Court: Youthfulness, Criminal Responsibility, and Sentencing Policy," Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology (Fall 1997)
No: from "Justice for Children: How Do We Get There?" Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology (Fall 1997)
Should Cameras Be Allowed Inside U.S. Courtrooms?
Yes: from "Courtroom Cameras," Notre Dame Law Review (May 1997)
No: from "Judicial Conference Nixes Cameras in Courtrooms," Defense Counsel Journal (September 6, 2000)
Do "Three Strikes" Sentencing Laws Help to Reduce Serious Crime?
Yes: from "The Deterrent Effect of Three Strikes Law," FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin (April 1999)
No: from "Three Strikes Laws," Human Rights (Spring 2002)
Punishment
Does Confining Sex Offenders Indefinitely in Mental Hospitals After They Have Served Their Prison Sentences Violate the Constitution?
Yes: from Dissenting Opinion, Kansas v. Hendricks, U.S. Supreme Court (1997)
No: from Opinion, Kansas v. Hendricks, U.S. Supreme Court (1997)
Should Homosexual Prison Inmates Have a Right to Share the Same Cell?
Yes: from "Veney v. Wyche: Not in My Cell-The Constitutionality of Segregating Prisoners Based on Their Sexual Orientation," Law & Sexuality (2003)
No: from Opinion, Veney v. Wyche, Fourth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals (2002)
Are Supermax (Control Unit) Prisons an Appropriate Way to Punish Hardened Criminals?
Yes: from "To The Max," Corrections Today (February 1998)
No: from "Supermax Prisons: Panacea or Desperation?" Corrections Management Quarterly (Spring 1999)
Should Private "For Profit" Corporations Be Allowed to Run U.S. Prisons?
Yes: from "Low Cost, High Quality, Good Fit: Why Not Privatization?" in Gary W. Bowman, Simon Hakim, and Paul Seidenstat, eds., Privatizing Correctional Institutions (Transaction Publishers, 1993)
No: from "The Problem of Prison Privatization: The U.S. Experience," in Andrew Coyle, Allison Campbell, and Rodney Newfeld, eds., Capitalist Punishment: Prison Privatization & Human Rights (Clarity Press, 2003)
Social Justice Issues
Is the Death Penalty an Unacceptable Punishment for Juveniles?
Yes: from Opinion, Roper v. Simmons, U.S. Supreme Court (2005)
No: from Dissenting Opinion, Roper v. Simmons, U.S. Supreme Court (2005)
Should Law Enforcement Agencies Use Affirmative Action Programs to Increase the Number of Minority Police Officers?
Yes: from "Beyond Affirmative Action, Police Response to a Changing Society," Journal of California Law Enforcement (vol. 33, no. 2, 1999)
No: from "How Racial P.C. Corrupted the LAPD," The American Enterprise (June 2005)
Are Female Police Officers as Effective as Male Officers?
Yes: from "Are Women Better Cops?" Time (February 17, 1992)
No: from "Cops and Gender P.C.," The American Enterprise (June 2005)
Do Crack Cocaine Laws Discriminate Against African-Americans and Other Minority Groups?
Yes: from "Race and Class Penalties in Crack Cocaine Sentencing," The Sentencing Project (2002)
No: from "The State, Criminal Law, and Racial Discrimination: A Comment," Harvard Law Review (April 1994)
Contributors
Index

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