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    Quantum Physics of Consciousness

    ISBN-10: 0982955278
    ISBN-13: 9780982955277
    Author(s): Bruce Rosenblum, Fred Kuttner, Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics Mathematical Institute Roger Penrose
    Description: The Quantum Physics of the Mind, Explained. Table of Contents 1. The Universe, Quantum Physics, and Consciousness. Subhash Kak, Head, Department of Computer Science, Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma. 2. Quantum Reality and Mind. Henry P. Stapp,  More...
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    Publisher: Cosmology.com
    Binding: Paperback
    Pages: 300
    Size: 6.30" wide x 70.08" long x 100.00" tall
    Weight: 1.430
    Language: English

    The Quantum Physics of the Mind, Explained. Table of Contents 1. The Universe, Quantum Physics, and Consciousness. Subhash Kak, Head, Department of Computer Science, Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma. 2. Quantum Reality and Mind. Henry P. Stapp, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California. 3. Cosmos and Quantum: Frontiers for the Future. Menas Kafatos, Schmid College of Science, Chapman University. 4. Neoclassical Cosmology and Menas Kafatos's "Cosmos and Quantum: Frontiers for the Future" Theodore Walker Jr., Southern Methodist University, Perkins School of Theology, Dallas, Texas, USA. 5. Can Discoverability Help Us Understand Cosmology? Nicholas Beale, Director of Sciteb: One Heddon Street, London. 6. On Meaning, Consciousness and Quantum Physics. Yair Neuman, and Boaz Tamir, Office for Interdisciplinary Research Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; Israel Institute for Advanced Research Rehovot, Israel. 7. Quantum Reality and Evolution Theory. Lothar Schafer, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas. 8. Four Perspectives on Consciousness. Varadaraja V. Raman, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY. 9. Synchronicity, Quantum Information and the Psyche. Francois Martin, Ph.D., Federico Carminati, Giuliana Galli Carminati, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, Universities Paris. Department of Physics, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Department of Psychiatry, University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland. 10. Speculations about the Direct Effects of Intention on Physical Manifestation. Imants Baru s, Department of Psychology, King's University College at The University of Western Ontario. 11. Consciousness and Quantum Measurement: New Empirical Data. York H. Dobyns, Department of Electrical Engineering, Engineering Quadrangle, Princeton University, Princeton. 12. Consciousness and Quantum Physics: A Deconstruction of the Topic Gordon 1Globus, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Philosophy, University of California. 13. Logic of Quantum Mechanics and Phenomenon of Consciousness Michael B. Mensky, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. 14. A Quantum Physical Effect of Consciousness Shan Gao, Unit for HPS & Centre for Time, SOPHI, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia 15. The Conscious Observer in the Quantum Experiment Fred Kuttner and Bruce Rosenblum, Physics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz. 16. Does Quantum Mechanics Require A Conscious Observer? Michael Nauenberg, Physics Dept. University of Califonia Santa Cruz. 17. Consciousness Vectors Steven Bodovitz, BioPerspectives, San Francisco, CA. 18. Quantum Physics, Advanced Waves and Consciousness Antonella Vannini and Ulisse Di Corpo, Lungotevere degli Artigiani, Rome, Italy. 19. The Quantum Hologram And the Nature of Consciousness Edgar D. Mitchell and Robert Staretz 20. Consciousness in the Universe: Neuroscience, Quantum Space-Time Geometry. Sir Roger Penrose, Stuart Hamerof 21. Quantum Physics and the Multiplicity of Mind: Split-Brains, Fragmented Minds, Dissociation, Quantum Consciousness. R. Joseph, Twenty-one Conscious Raising Articles, 300 Mind Expanding Pages, from the Top Experts in the World, Peer Reviewed, and Originally Published in Journal of Cosmology.

    Albert Einstein was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm. He spent his childhood in Munich where his family owned a small machine shop. By the age of twelve, Einstein had taught himself Euclidean Geometry. His family moved to Milan, where he stayed for a year, and he used it as an excuse to drop out of school, which bored him. He finished secondary school in Aarau, Switzerland and entered the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. Einstein graduated in 1900, by studying the notes of a classmate since he did not attend his classes out of boredom, again. His teachers did not like him and would not recomend him for a position in the University. For two years, Einstein worked as a substitute teacher and a tutor before getting a job, in 1902, as an examiner for a Swiss patent office in Bern. In 1905, he received his doctorate from the University of Zurich for a theoretical dissertation on the dimension of molecules. Einstein also published three theoretical papers of central importance to the development of 20th Century physics. The first was entitled "Brownian Motion," and the second "Photoelectric Effort," which was a revolutionary way of thinking and contradicted tradition. No one accepted the proposals of the first two papers. Then the third one was published in 1905 and called "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies." Einstein's words became what is known today as the special theory of relativity and said that the physical laws are the same in all inertial reference systems and that the speed of light in a vacuum is a universal constant. Virtually no one understood or supported Einstein's argument. Einstein left the patent office in 1907 and received his first academic appointment at the University of Zurich in 1909. In 1911, he moved to a German speaking university in Prague, but returned to Swiss National Polytechnic in Zurich in 1912. By 1914, Einstein was appointed director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Physics in Berlin. His chief patron in those early days was German physicist Max Planck and lent much credibility to Einstein's work. Einstein began working on generalizing and extending his theory of relativity, but the full general theory was not published until 1916. In 1919, he predicted that starlight would bend in the vicinity of a massive body, such as the sun. This theory was confirmed during a solar eclipse and cause Einstein to become world renowned after the phenomenon. Einstein received be Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921. With his new fame, Einstein attempted to further his own political and social views. He supported pacifism and Zionism and opposed Germany's involvement in World War I. His support of Zionism earned him attacks from both Anti-Semitic and right wing groups in Germany. Einstein left Germany for the United States when Hitler came into power, taking a position at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Once there, he renounced his stand on pacifism in the face of Nazi rising power. In 1939 he collaborated with other physicists in writing a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt informing him of the possibility that the Nazis may in fact be attempting to create an atomic bomb. The letter bore only Einstein's signature but lent credence to the letter and spurred the U.S. race to create the bomb first. Einstein became an American citizen in 1940. After the war, Einstein was active in international disarmament as well as world government. He was offered the position of President of Israel but turned the honor down. Albert Einstein died on April 18, 1955 in Princeton, New Jersey.Born in England, the son of a geneticist, Roger Penrose received a Ph.D. in 1957 from Cambridge University. Penrose then became a professor of applied mathematics at Birkbeck College in 1966 and a Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University in 1973. Penrose, a mathematician and theoretical physicist, has done much to elucidate the fundamental properties of black holes. With Stephen Hawking, Penrose proved a theorem of Albert Einstein's general relativity, asserting that at the center of a black hole there must evolve a "space-time singularity" of zero volume and infinite density, in which the current laws of physics do not apply. He also proposed the hypothesis of "cosmic censorship," which claims that such singularities must possess an event horizon. In 1969 Penrose described a process for the extraction of energy from a black hole, as well as how rotational energy of the black hole is transferred to a particle outside the hole. In addition, Penrose has done much to develop the mathematics needed to unite general relativity, which deals with the gravitational interactions of matter, and quantum mechanics, which describes all other interactions.

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