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United States and Coercive Diplomacy

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ISBN-10: 1929223447

ISBN-13: 9781929223442

Edition: 2003

Authors: Robert J. Art, Patrick M. Cronin

List price: $19.95
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Description:

With increasing frequency, U.S. leaders look to achieve their foreign policy goals by marrying diplomacy to military muscle. Since the end of the Cold War, "coercive diplomacy"'”the effort to change the behavior of a target state or group through the threat or limited use of military force'”has been used in no fewer than eight cases. But what, exactly, has the concept of coercive diplomacy meant in recent practice? What are coercive diplomacy's objectives? How does it operate? And how well does it work? To answer these questions, Robert Art and Patrick Cronin have enlisted a distinguished cast of scholars and practitioners to investigate the record of the past twelve years. Each author focuses on one of coercive diplomacy's recent targets, a remarkably diverse group ranging from North Korea to Serbia to the Taliban, from warlords to terrorists to regional superpowers. As Robert Art makes clear in a groundbreaking conclusion that will give scholars food for thought and policymakers reason to pause, those results have been mixed at best. Art dissects the uneven performance of coercive diplomacy and explains why it has sometimes worked and why it has more often failed.
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Book details

List price: $19.95
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: United States Institute of Peace Press (USIP Press)
Publication date: 5/1/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 396
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.628
Language: English

Robert J. Art is Christian A. Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University. He is the author of The TFX Decision: McNamara and the Military and coeditor of The United States and Coercive Diplomacy (with Patrick Cronin) and U.S. Foreign Policy: the Search for a New Role (with Seyom Brown).

Patrick M. Cronin is assistant administrator at the U.S. Agency for International Development and former director of research and studies at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction
Humanitarian Relief and Nation Building in Somalia
Coercive Diplomacy in the Balkans: The U.S. Use of Force in Bosnia and Kosovo
The Delicate Balance between Coercion and Diplomacy: The Case of Haiti, 1994
Nuclear Weapons and North Korea: Who's Coercing Whom?
The 1995-96 Taiwan Strait Confrontation: Coercion, Credibility, and the Use of Force
Coercive Diplomacy against Iraq, 1990-98
Coercive Diplomacy and the Response to Terrorism
Coercive Diplomacy: What Do We Know?
Index