Skip to content

Amnesty after Atrocity? Healing Nations after Genocide and War Crimes

ISBN-10: 1594513171

ISBN-13: 9781594513176

Edition: 2007

Authors: Helena Cobban

List price: $46.95
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

In Amnesty after Atrocity? veteran journalist Helena Cobban examines the effectiveness of different ways of dealing with the aftermath of genocide and violence committed during deep intergroup conflicts. She traveled to Rwanda, Mozambique, and South Africa to assess the various ways those nations tried to come to grips with their violent past: from war crimes trials to truth commissions to outright amnesties for perpetrators. She discovered that in terms of both moving these societies forward and satisfying the needs of survivors, war crimes trials are not the most effective path. This work provides strategic historical context and includes interviews with a cross-section of the panoply of humanity that makes up any post-atrocity society: community leaders, victims, policymakers, teachers, rights activists, and even some former abusers. These first-person accounts create a rich, readable text, and Cobban's overall conclusions will surprise many readers in the West.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $46.95
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: Routledge
Publication date: 3/15/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 296
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.880
Language: English

Helena Cobban is a columnist for the Christian Science Monitor and a contributing writer at the Boston Review. She has also written several books, including The Moral Architecture of World Peace (University of Virginia Press 2000), The Superpowers and the Syrian-Israeli Conflict (Praeger Publishers 1991) and The Making of Modern Lebanon (Hutchinson 1985).

List of Acronyms
Preface
Atrocities, Conflicts, and Peacemaking
Dealing with the Aftermath of Atrocity
South Africa
Mozambique
Rwanda
What Are the Policy Meta-Tasks?
Rwanda: Court Processes After Mass Violence
Atrocities, War, and War Termination
The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
Justice and Rebuilding Inside Rwanda
Politics, Society, and Reconciliation
South Africa: Amnesties, Truth-Seeking-and Reconciliation?
From Conflict to Peacemaking
How the TRC Worked
South Africans Look Back at the TRC
Mozambique: Heal and Rebuild
Atrocities, War, and Peace
Mozambique, 1992-2005
Comparing Postconflict Justice in Rwanda, South Africa, and Mozambique
Comparing the Burdens of Conflict and Atrocity
Ending the Conflicts
The Postconflict Era
Outcomes
Conclusion
Restoring Peacemaking, Revaluing History
Restoring Peacemaking
Negotiations Versus the Temptations of Victory
Prosecutions, Opportunity Costs, and Peacebuilding
Notions of Accountability and Punishment
Accountability, Individualism, and Manichaeism
Remorse, Culture, Memory, and Peacebuilding
Peacebuilding as a Process over Time
Revaluing the Role of Religion
Lessons from Mozambique
Peacebuilding and Atrocity Prevention in the Twenty-First Century
Notes
Name Index
Subject Index