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Violent Belongings Partition, Gender, and National Culture in Postcolonial India

ISBN-10: 159213744X

ISBN-13: 9781592137442

Edition: 2011

Authors: Kavita Daiya

List price: $31.95
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Description:

Focusing on the historical and contemporary narration of the Partition of India,Violent Belongingsexamines transnational South Asian culture from 1947 onwards. Spanning the Indian subcontinent and its diasporas in the United Kingdom and the United States, it asks how postcolonial/diasporic literature (eg., Rushdie, Mistry, Sidwa and Lahiri), Bollywood film, personal testimonies and journalism represent the violence, migration and questions of national belonging unleashed by that pivotal event during which two million people died and sixteen million were displaced. In addition to challenging the official narratives of independence and Partition, these narratives challenge our contemporary understanding of gender and ethnicity in history and politics.Violent Belongingsargues that both male and female bodies, and heterosexual coupledom, became symbols of the nation in public life. In the newly independent Indian nation both men and women were transformed into ideal citizens or troubling bodies, immigrants or refugees, depending on whether they were ethnically Hindu, Muslim, Jewish or Sikh. The divisions set in motion during Partition continue into our own time and account for ethnic violence in South Asia.
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Book details

List price: $31.95
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Temple University Press
Publication date: 2/4/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 274
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

Acknowledgments
Train to Pakistan 2007: Decolonization, Partition, and Identity in the Transnational Public Sphere
Re-Gendering the Nation: Masculinity, Romance, and Secular Citizenship
�A Crisis Made Flesh�: Women, Honor, and National Coupledom
�We Were Never Refugees�: Migrants and Citizens in the Postcolonial State
War and Peace: Pakistan and Ethnic Citizenship in Bollywood Cinema
Provincializing the Nation: State Violence and Transnational Belongings in the Diaspora
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index