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Game Design for Teens

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ISBN-10: 1592004962

ISBN-13: 9781592004966

Edition: 2005

Authors: Eric Nunamaker, Scott Pugh, Les Pardew, Brent L. Iverson, Ross Wolfley

List price: $29.99
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You might have a truly amazing idea for a game, but do you know what to do with it? Transforming your idea into an actual game can be a daunting task. You must have an understanding of game art, programming, audio, and business in order to produce the solid game design document that can turn your really cool idea into a really cool game. "Game Design for Teens" is here to help you develop the skills you need to do just that. Study several real-world examples and learn from the experience of industry professionals as you focus on the techniques and elements that go into creating a game design document. Get ready to set your idea into motion as you turn it from a concept into a reality!
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Book details

List price: $29.99
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Course Technology
Publication date: 9/30/2004
Binding: Mixed Media
Pages: 304
Size: 7.25" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.386
Language: English

Introduction
What Is Game Design?
What's in the Book?
How Are Games Designed?
Vision of the Game
The Game Layout Chart
Designing Gameplay
Designing the Story
Designing Characters
Character Description
Character Sketch
Designing Environments
Written Description
Environment Pictures
Designing Audio
Interface Design
Onscreen Interface Graphics
Designing Fun
Game Demo
Game Engines
Art for Demos
Sound for Demos
Non-Playable Demo
Summary
What Is a Game Designer?
The Game Designer
Love to Play Games
Creative Thinker
The Game Development Process
Solving Problems
Is It Fun?
Do You Like to Work?
Dedication to Games
Getting Started
Research
Create
Analyze
The Concept Document
Writing the Document
Character Design
Research
Creativity
Analyze
The Character Design
Summary
The Design Document
Layout of the Design Document
Design Document Elements
Introduction
Game Overview
Position the Game
Game Features
Summary
The Game Idea
Where Can I Find an Idea?
Examples
Read
Any Questions?
What Will the Game Do?
What Are the Goals of the Game?
Pick Your Genre, Any Genre
Action-Adventure and Bears, Oh My!
Fighting
First-Person Shooter
Hunting
Puzzle
Role Playing Games
Simulation
Sports
Strategy
Multiplayer
What's Your Story?
How Big Can I Make It?
What to Keep
What to Throw Out
Don't Keep It in Your Head
The High Concept
The Purpose of the High Concept
Writing the High Concept
The Game Statement
Why the Game Is Important
Why the Game Is Unique
Audience
Why Should the Game Be Published?
Summary
Visualizing the Game
Art Used in Game Designs
Storyboards
Level Layouts
Environment Illustrations
Character Designs
Model Sheets
Graphical User Interface (GUI) Design
Other Concept Art
Summary
Designing Audio
Character Voices and Speech
Script
Talent Search
Recording
For the Technically Curious
What We Hear
What the Computer Hears
Sound Effects
Realistic
Non-Realistic
Music
First Steps
Basic Organization
Summary
Game Flow
The Flowchart
The Oval
The Diamond
The Rectangle
The Circle
Sample Flowchart
An Alternate to Flowcharting
Take a Shower Textual Sequence
Manageable Pieces
Game Flow Design Methods
Main Game Flowchart
Gameplay Flowchart
One Player Career Flowchart
Two Player Career Flowchart
Race Flowchart
Summary
User Interface Design
What Is a User Interface?
How Does the Player Receive Game Information?
Can Interface Elements Be Incorporated into the Natural Play of the Game?
How Can the Interface Affect the Game?
How Can the Player Control the Game?
Controlling Your Controls
Feedback
Information Presentation
Personality
The Visual
What Is a Graphical User Interface?
Information Screens
Menus
Onscreen Displays
Creating Game Navigation Design
Creating Onscreen Elements
Summary
Technical Design
The Sections of a TDD
Target Hardware System(s)
Target Audience
Processor Use
Memory Use
Saving and Loading
Supported Input Devices
Supported Output Devices
Al
Multiplayer
Concerns and Potential Problems
Software Tools
Data Wrangling
Database Handling
Scheduling
Game Flow
Game Engine
Needed Assets
Languages
Audio Handling
Physics
Sample Art
User-Defined Worlds
Summary
Schedules and Budgets
What Comes First, the Chicken or the Egg?
Breaking Down the Tasks
Creating the Framework of Dependencies
Gantt Charts
Critical Path
Scheduling
Budgeting
Direct Labor Costs
Easy Adjustments
Putting the Budget Together
Summary
Special Considerations
Puzzle
Platform
Adventure
Racing
Fighting
Sports
Real-Time Strategy
Turn-Based Strategy
Shooters
Simulations
Role Playing
Massive Multiplayer Online
Summary
Design Document
Motocross Professional Circuit
Design Document by Alpine Studios
Table of Contents
Introduction
Game Overview
Platform
Genre
Target Audience
Languages
Street Date
Key Features
Unique Selling Points
Career Path
Game Structure
Camera Viewpoint
Camera
Modes of Play
Trick Mode or Free Ride
Motion
Trick Motions
Level Overview
In-Game Progress, Timers, and Clocks
Race Replay
Report Card
Reward to Trophy Screens
Model Production and Development
Equipment and Upgrades
Track Editor (In-Game)
Special Effects
Technical Design
Processor Use
Main Memory Map
Geometry
Animation
Graphics
Audio
Saving
Physics
Al
Art Development
Potential Trouble Spots (Risk Areas)
Player Control
Level Design
Texture Development
Bug Type Description
Game Features
Fun
Motorcycles
Game Play and Rewards
Art Style
Audio Experience
Game Structure
General Viewpoint
Modes of Play
Player Controls General Keystroke Controls
Technical Issues
Geometry
Main Memory Map
Animation
Graphics
Audio
Saving
Physics
Al
Art Development
Sample Art
Development Team
Schedule and Budget
Index