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Equal Danger

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ISBN-10: 1590170628

ISBN-13: 9781590170625

Edition: 2003

Authors: Leonardo Sciascia, Adrienne W. Foulke, Carlin Romano

List price: $14.95
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Description:

District Attorney Varga is shot dead. Then Judge Sanza is killed. Then Judge Azar. Are these random murders, or part of a conspiracy? Inspector Rogas thinks he might know, but as soon as he makes progress he is transferred and encouraged to pin the crimes on the Left. And yet how committed are the cynical, fashionable, comfortable revolutionaries to revolution—or anything? Who is doing what to whom? Equal Danger is set in an imaginary country, one that seems all too real. It is the most extreme—and gripping—depiction of the politics of paranoia by Leonardo Sciascia, master of the metaphysical detective novel.
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Book details

List price: $14.95
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: New York Review of Books, Incorporated, The
Publication date: 10/31/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 152
Size: 5.00" wide x 8.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.396
Language: English

Born in Sicily, Sciascia was a literary and critical genius as well as a best-selling activist-writer. In the tradition of such Sicilian writers as Luigi Pirandello and Giuseppe Di Lampedusa, he explored in neorealist novels the island's impact on its inhabitants' lives: how they coped with crime, the Mafia, and corruption. His best-known works include The Day of the Owl, The Sicilian Relatives, and the collection of short stories The Wine-Dark Sea. In his most controversial work, The Moro Affair, he implicated Italy's leaders in the 1978 kidnapping and murder of former premier Aldo Moro by the leftist terrorist group, the Red Brigade. Though a long-time Communist, Sciascia eventually left the party to become a member of the Radical party, whose tenets were closer to his own anarchist leanings. As a representative of the party, Sciascia was elected to both the Italian and European Parliaments.