Skip to content

Models of Brief Psychodynamic Therapy A Comparative Approach

ISBN-10: 1572303409

ISBN-13: 9781572303409

Edition: 1995

Authors: Stanley B. Messer, C. Seth Warren

List price: $44.00
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $44.00
Copyright year: 1995
Publisher: Guilford Publications
Publication date: 1/2/1998
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 374
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.188
Language: English

Stanley B. Messer, PhD, is Professor and Chairperson in the Department of Clinical Psychology at the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, Rutgers University. He is coeditor, with Alan S. Gurman, ofEssential Psychotherapies, with C. Seth Warren ofModels of Brief Psychodynamic Therapy, and with Paul L. Wachtel ofTheories of Psychotherapy: Origins and Evolution. He has been an Associate Editor ofAmerican Psychologistand is on the editorial boards of several other journals. He has written extensively about the prospects for psychotherapy integration, and conducts research on brief psychotherapy. Dr. Messer practices psychodynamic psychotherapy in Highland Park, New Jersey. C. Seth Warren, PhD, is Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, Rutgers University. Dr. Warren maintains a private practice in psychoanalytic psychotherapy in the New York City metropolitan area.

Introduction
The Advent of Brief Psychodynamic Therapy
Basic Models of Brief Psychodynamic Therapy
The Drive/Structural Model: Malan, Davanloo, and Sifneos
The Relational Model: Luborsky, Horowitz, Weiss and Sampson, and Strupp and Binder
Integrative and Eclectic Models of Brief Psychodynamic Therapy
An Integrative Psychoanalytic Model: Mann
Eclectic Approaches: Garfield, Bellak, and Gustafson
Special Topics in Brief Psychodynamic Therapy
Assessing and Treating the Difficult Patient
Treating Children, Adolescents, and the Elderly: A Lifespan Developmental Approach
Epilogue: Whither (Wither?) Psychotherapy?