Skip to content

Weather A Visual Guide

Spend $50 to get a free movie!

ISBN-10: 1554074304

ISBN-13: 9781554074303

Edition: N/A

Authors: Bruce Buckley, Edward J. Hopkins, Richard Whitaker

List price: $27.95
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
Out of stock
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $27.95
Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
Publication date: 8/15/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 304
Size: 9.25" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 2.640
Language: English

Bruce Buckley, Edward J. Hopkins and Richard Whitaker

Whitaker is a meteorological consultant who provides services to businesses, governments and educational organizations. He is a former manager of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's commercial unit in New South Wales.

Introduction
The Weather Engine
Fueled by the heat of the Sun, the weather is a system of cycles and forces within the atmosphere, the blanket of air that surrounds our planet. Vast waves of air and swirls of cloud circulate in complex, everchanging patterns, giving rise to winds, storms and other weather phenomena.
What is weather?
The solar powerhouse
The seasons
Earth's system
The energy cycle
The atmosphere
Atmospheric pressure
Global winds
Jet streams
Winds at sea
Frontal systems
Highs and lows
Heating and cooling
The monsoon
Local winds
Extreme winds
Ocean currents
Weather in Action
The beauty of a cloud formation, the symmetry of a rainbow, the life-giving power of rain and the eerie quiet of a winter snowstorm -- all these are expressions of weather in action. And all owe their origin to water in the atmosphere.
The nature of water
The water cycle
Humidity
Dew and frost
Cloud formation
Vortices and waves
Cloud classification
Types of cloud: high clouds
Types of cloud: middle clouds
Types of cloud: low clouds
Types of cloud: vertical clouds
Types of cloud: unusual clouds
Fog and mist
Kinds of precipitation
Rain and drizzle
Snow, Ice and hail
Color and light
Rainbows and coronas
Haloes and sundogs
Auroras
Extreme Weather
Weather is perhaps the last wild thing on Earth. The extreme winds of hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards and ice storms; the destructive power of avalanches, floods, wildfires and droughts -- all are reminders of the elemental forces of weather.
Thunderstorms
Lightning
Types of lightning
Hailstorms and microbursts
Blizzards and ice storms
Tornadoes
Tornado Alley
Tornado watch
Whirlwinds and dust devils
Hurricanes
Hurricane impact
Hurricane watch
Floods, landslides and avalanches
Droughts
Heatwaves and wildfires
Dust storms
Record-breaking weather
Extreme weather: USA
Extreme weather: Europe
Surviving extreme weather
Watching the Weather
Weather forecasting is today a complex and highly technical process, relying on observation, satellite photography, radar and computer simulations. It has come a long way since the days of superstition and sky gods.
Weather lore
Scientific beginnings
The Renaissance
The Age of Reason
Toward the modern era
Meteorology today
Measuring weather
Weather at home
Monitoring the Sun
Weather organizations
Weather models
Seasonal forecasts
Mapping the weather
Tracking the weather with radar
Weather from above
Natural inspiration
Global Climate
From Antarctic emperor penguins to the zebras of the African savanna, from lush tropical forests to desert cacti, the great diversity of life on Earth is largely a response to the challenges presented by our planet's different climates. Throughout the globe, humans too have made the most of this climatic variety.
Climate zones
Tropical
Subtropical
Arid
Semiarid
Mediterranean
Temperate
Northern temperate
Polar
Mountain
Coastal
Weather and landform
Adaptations to weather: plants
Adaptations to weather: animals
Adaptations to weather: humans
Harnessing the weather
Modifying the weather
Climate: inner planets
Climate: outer planets
The Changing Climate
Earth's climate has changed throughout the history of our planet. Many of these fluctuations are short-term patterns, but movements of air, water and landmasses all contribute to long-term change. The human impact, too, is significant: when we alter Earth's ecosystem, the effects can be dramatic.
The big picture
Long-term climate change
Global forces at work
Before the dinosaurs
The dinosaur era
Natural climate clues
Evidence from the glaciers
Volcanic skies
Ice ages
Recent freezes
Climate and civilization
The enhanced greenhouse effects
The human impact
Ozone depletion
Global warming
El Ni�o / La Ni�a
The future
Factfile
Glossary
Index