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Mary Barton and Other Tales

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ISBN-10: 1551111691

ISBN-13: 9781551111698

Edition: 2000

Authors: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, Jennifer Foster

List price: $9.95
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Description:

Mrs Gaskell's first novel, Mary Barton portrays city life in the hungry forties of the 19th century. In this Broadview edition, a new introduction focusses on the novel's artistry and its liberal politics.
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Book details

List price: $9.95
Copyright year: 2000
Publisher: Broadview Press
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 590
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.496

Elizabeth Gaskell was the daughter of a Unitarian clergyman, who was also a civil servant and journalist. Her mother died when she was young, and she was brought up by her aunt in Knutsford, a small village that was the prototype for Cranford, Hollingford and the setting for numerous other short stories. In 1832, she married William Gaskell, a Unitarian clergyman in Manchester. She participated in his ministry and collaborated with him to write the poem "Sketches Among the Poor" in 1837. "Our Society at Cranford" was the first two chapters of "Cranford" and it appeared in Dickens' Household Words in 1851. Dickens liked it so much that he pressed Gaskell for more episodes, and she produced eight more of them between 1852 and 1853. She also wrote, mainly for Dickens, "My Lady Ludlow" and "Lois the Witch," a novella that concerns the Salem witch trials. "Wives and Daughters: An Every-day Story" ran in Cornhill from August 1864 to January 1866. The final installment was never written but the ending was known and the novel exists now virtually complete. The story centers on a series of relationships between family groups in Hollingford. Most critics agree that her greatest achievement is the short novel "Cousin Phillis." Gaskell was also followed by controversy. In 1853, she offended many readers with "Ruth," which explored seduction and illegitimacy that led the "fallen woman" into ostracism and inevitable prostitution. The novel presents the social conduct in a small community when tolerance and morality clash. Critics praised the novel's moral lessons but Gaskell's own congregation burned the book and it was banned in many libraries. In 1857, "The Life of Charlotte Bronte" was published. The biography was initially praised but angry protests came from some of the people it dealt with. Gaskell wrote of Bronte's version on his dismissal from his tutoring position. He blamed it on his refusal to be seduced by his employer's wife. She was threatened with legal action but, with the help of her husband, the problems were resolved. Gaskell was against any biographical notice of her being written during her lifetime. After her death in 1865, her family refused to make family letters or biographical data available.

Introduction
Biographical Note
Note on the Text
Further Reading
Notice
Preface
Two Lectures on the Lancashire Dialect
Appendices
Explanatory Notes