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Kids, Cops, and Confessions Inside the Interrogation Room

ISBN-10: 1479816388

ISBN-13: 9781479816385

Edition: 2014

Authors: Barry C. Feld

List price: $21.99
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Description:

Juveniles possess less maturity, intelligence, and competence than adults, heightening their vulnerability in the justice system. For this reason, states try juveniles in separate courts and use different sentencing standards than for adults. Yet, when police bring kids in for questioning, they use the same interrogation tactics they use for adults, including trickery, deception, and lying to elicit confessions or to produce incriminating evidence against the defendants. In Kids, Cops, and Confessions, Barry Feld offers the first report of what actually happens when police question juveniles. Drawing on remarkable data, Feld analyzes interrogation tapes and transcripts, police reports, juvenile court filings and sentences, and probation and sentencing reports, describing in rich detail what actually happens in the interrogation room. Contrasting routine interrogation and false confessions enables police, lawyers, and judges to identify interrogations that require enhanced scrutiny, to adopt policies to protect citizens, and to assure reliability and integrity of the justice system. Feld has produced an invaluable look at how the justice system really works.
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Book details

List price: $21.99
Copyright year: 2014
Publisher: New York University Press
Publication date: 9/22/2014
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 351
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.034
Language: English

Barry C. Feld is Centennial Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota and author or editor of many books, including The Oxford Handbook of Juvenile Crime and Juvenile Justice , Cases and Materials on Juvenile Justice Administration , and Bad Kids: Race and the Transformation of the Juvenile Court .