Skip to content

We A New Translation of the Classic Science Fiction Novel

ISBN-10: 1478375035

ISBN-13: 9781478375036

Edition: N/A

Authors: Yevgeny Zamyatin, Alexander Glinka

List price: $6.99
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Before there was "1984" or "Brave New World," there was "We"--the dystopian Russian novel considered to be the godfather of all dystopia fiction."We" is set in the future. The novel is set in an urban nation constructed almost entirely of glass, which allows the secret police/spies to inform on and supervise the public more easily. Life is organized to promote maximum productive efficiency along the lines of the system advocated by the hugely influential F.W. Taylor. People march in step with each other and wear identical clothing. There is no way of referring to people save by their given numbers. Males have odd numbers prefixed by consonants, females have even numbers prefixed by vowels. Everything is fine until a mathematician named D-503 decides that he is no longer going to conform.This modern translation of Yevgeny Zamyatin book introduces the classic novel to a brand new audience. It is translated from the original manuscript dated 1920 / 1921--not the 1952 version, which has been more commonly used for modern translation.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $6.99
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Publication date: 8/5/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 136
Size: 7.00" wide x 10.00" long x 0.31" tall
Weight: 0.902
Language: English

Zamyatin studied at the Polytechnic Institute in St. Petersburg and became a professional naval engineer. His first story appeared in 1908, and he became serious about writing in 1913, when his short novel A Provincial Tale (1913) was favorably received. He became part of the neorealist group, which included Remizov and Prishvin. During World War I, he supervised the construction of icebreakers in England for the Russian government. After his return home, he published two satiric works about English life, "The Islanders" (1918) and "The Fisher of Men" (1922). During the civil war and the early 1920s, Zamyatin published theoretical essays as well as fiction. He played a central role in many cultural activities---as an editor, organizer, and teacher of literary technique---and had an important influence on younger writers, such as Olesha and Ivanov. Zamyatin's prose after the Revolution involved extensive use of ellipses, color symbolism, and elaborate chains of imagery. It is exemplified in such well-known stories as "Mamai" (1921) and "The Cage" (1922). His best-known work is the novel We (1924), a satiric, futuristic tale of a dystopia that was a plausible extrapolation from early twentieth-century social and political trends. The book, which directly influenced George Orwell's (see Vol. 1) 1984, 1984, was published abroad in several translations during the 1920s. In 1927 a shortened Russian version appeared in Prague, and the violent press campaign that followed led to Zamyatin's resignation from a writers' organization and, eventually, to his direct appeal to Stalin for permission to leave the Soviet Union. This being granted in 1931, Zamyatin settled in Paris, where he continued to work until his death. Until glasnost he was unpublished and virtually unknown in Russia.