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Alger Hiss Why He Chose Treason

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ISBN-10: 1451655436

ISBN-13: 9781451655438

Edition: 2012

Authors: Christina Shelton

List price: $21.99
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Description:

A former U.S. Intelligence analyst shines a fresh light on accused Soviet spy Alger Hiss, providing “a solid look at the specifics of the case as well as a useful overview of the ideological debate gripping America” (Kirkus Reviews).In 1948, former U.S. State Department official Alger Hiss was accused of being a Soviet spy. Because the statute of limitations on espionage had run out, he was convicted only of perjury. Decades later—after the Hiss trial had been long forgotten by most—archival evidence surfaced confirming the accusations: a public servant with access to classified documents had indeed passed crucial information to the Soviets for more than a decade.Yet many on the American…    
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Book details

List price: $21.99
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Threshold Editions
Publication date: 4/23/2013
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 352
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

Christina Shelton is a retired U.S. intelligence analyst. She spent twenty-two years working as a Soviet analyst and a Counterintelligence Branch Chief at the Defense Intelligence Agency. She has alsonbsp;been a staff analyst at various think tanks.

Introduction
Foreword
Prologue
The Early Years
Growing Up in Baltimore
Hopkins and Harvard Law
Priscilla Hiss
Supreme Court Clerk and Attomey-at-Law
A Committed Communist
The New Dealer
The Ware Group
Whittaker Chambers
The Witness
The GRU
The State Department Bureaucrat
Yalta
Fascism and Communism
Accused and Convicted
The Case
Lewisburg Prison
Crusade for Vindication, 1954-96
The Evidence
Testimonies
Venona Program
Archival Material
Hungarian Archives
KGB Archives
Epilogue
Note
Bibliography
Index