Skip to content

Big Brother Reality TV in the Twenty-First Century

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 1403916853

ISBN-13: 9781403916853

Edition: 2005

Authors: Jonathan Bignell

List price: $74.99
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
Out of stock
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Bignell presents an analysis of Reality TV, exploring its cultural and political meanings, explaining the genesis of the form and its relationship to contemporary television production, and considering how it connects with, and breaks away from, factual and fictional conventions in television.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $74.99
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date: 11/16/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 189
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.550
Language: English

Preface and Acknowledgements
Introduction
Genesis
Introduction
The documentary heritage
The possibilities of production technologies
Television institutions
Risking Reality TV
Reality TV as the end of documentary history
Case Study: Wife Swap
Conclusion
The World is Watching
Introduction
Reality TV and theories of globalization
International programmes and formats from Britain
The globalization of privacy publicized
Reality TV and television scheduling
The globalization of institutional forms
Local regulatory cultures
Case Study: Big Brother as a transnational property
Conclusion
Reality TV
Introduction
Generic conventions and docusoap
Docusoap, ordinariness and celebrity
The aesthetics of Reality TV
Reality TV and the public sphere
The passion and revelation of the real
Narration and mediation
Case Study: The House series: simulation, recreation and education
Conclusion
Drama
Introduction
Narrative forms
Performance and genre
Characters
Melodrama
Dramatizing gender
Reality TV and the displacement of drama
From docusoap to drama
Case Study: The Cruise, performance and authenticity
Conclusion
Surveillance
Introduction
The prison of the real
Spaces of surveillance
Discipline and confession
Rights and regulations
Threat and reassurance
Car crash TV
Case Study: witnessing and helping in Crimewatch UK
Conclusion
Big Brother Culture
Introduction
Cross-platform and intermedial texts
Audience composition and modes of address
Audience perceptions of Reality TV
Television institutions and Reality TV audiences
Television talk and gossip
Poaching and fandom
Case Study: The Osbournes, celebrity and multi-accentuality
Conclusion
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index