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On the Penitentiary System in the United States and Its Application in France; with an Appendix on Penal Colonies and Also Statistical Notes;

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ISBN-10: 1177783991

ISBN-13: 9781177783996

Edition: N/A

Authors: Gustave de Beaumont, Francis Lieber, Alexis de Tocqueville

List price: $32.75
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Description:

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.
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Book details

List price: $32.75
Publisher: BiblioBazaar
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 360
Size: 7.44" wide x 9.69" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.408
Language: English

French writer and politician Alexis de Tocqueville was born in Verneuil to an aristocratic Norman family. He entered the bar in 1825 and became an assistant magistrate at Versailles. In 1831, he was sent to the United States to report on the prison system. This journey produced a book called On the Penitentiary System in the United States (1833), as well as a much more significant work called Democracy in America (1835--40), a treatise on American society and its political system. Active in French politics, Tocqueville also wrote Old Regime and the Revolution (1856), in which he argued that the Revolution of 1848 did not constitute a break with the past but merely accelerated a trend toward greater centralization of government. Tocqueville was an observant Catholic, and this has been cited as a reason why many of his insights, rather than being confined to a particular time and place, reach beyond to see a universality in all people everywhere.