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Electoral Systems and Political Context How the Effects of Rules Vary Across New and Established Democracies

ISBN-10: 110760799X

ISBN-13: 9781107607996

Edition: 2012

Authors: Robert G. Moser, Ethan Scheiner

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Book details

Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 9/28/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 303
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.55" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Ethan Scheiner is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Davis. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science at Duke University in 2001. He has been a Visiting Scholar at Keio University (Mita) in Tokyo, Japan, an Advanced Research (postdoctoral) Fellow in the Program on U.S.- Japan Relations at Harvard University (2001-02), and a postdoctoral fellow at the Stanford Institute for International Studies (2002-2004). His work examines parties and elections within both Japan-specific and explicitly comparative contexts. He has published articles on political parties, elections and electoral systems in the British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, Electoral Studies, and Legislative Studies Quarterly. His analysis of recent Japanese elections appears (in Japanese) in Foresight Magazine in Japan.

Introduction: why don't electoral rules have the same effects in all countries?
When do the effects of electoral systems diverge from our expectations?
Mixed-member electoral systems: how they work and how they work for scholars
How democratic experience and party system development condition the effects of electoral rules on disproportionality and the number of parties: theory, measurement, and expectations
How democratic experience and party system development condition the effects of electoral rules on disproportionality and the number of parties: what we actually see
Political context, electoral rules, and their effects on strategic and personal voting
How democratic experience and party system development condition the effect of electoral rules on strategic defection
Social diversity, electoral rules, and the number of parties
How political context shapes the effect of electoral rules on women's representation
Conclusion: why and how political context matters for electoral system effects