Skip to content

Bodily Knowledge Learning about Equity and Justice with Adolescent Girls

ISBN-10: 0820444588

ISBN-13: 9780820444581

Edition: 2001

Authors: Kimberly L. Oliver, Rosary Lalik

List price: $30.95
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Bodily Knowledge is a story of how four adolescent girls constructed the meanings of their bodies. It is a story of oppression and resistance, voice and silence. It is a story of how our culture shapes girls' desires and distracts girls from becoming healthy people who pursue significant goals. Lastly, it is an expression of the girls' hopefulness - of their collective belief in the value of efforts to create a better world in which all children might have opportunities to grow up healthy and respected. Bodily Knowledge tells these stories in terms of the girls' analyses of fashion, their desires to be noticed and accepted by others, their concerns about issues of race and racism, and our own commitments to nurturing critique and agency through curriculum and activist research.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $30.95
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: Peter Lang AG International Academic Publishers
Publication date: 12/8/2000
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 133
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.25" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.484

Preface
Introduction
Theoretical Issues
Adolescence as a Period of Crisis
Middle-Class White Girls
Research beyond the Dominant Group
The "Other"
"Acting White"
Evidence from Statistical Research
Dichotomous Thinking and Objectification in
Western Culture
Mind/Body Dualism in the Service of Male Superiority
"Body-Image" Research
Body as Object
Pathologizing Girls' Experiences
Normalization
Understandings of the Body from Feminism
Constructions of Health
Traditional Views on Health
Health as a Complex Phenomenon
Working with the Girls
Selecting Collaborators
Nurturing Conversation
Understanding What the Girls Had to Say
Ethical Struggles
Getting to Know Others Personally
Reciprocity in Sharing Stories
Summary
"Fashion In" and "Fashion Out"
Images of Fashion
"Fashion In" and "Fashion Out"
"Healthy Hair"
"The Right Clothes and Shoes"
"Body Shape"
Being Feminine
Reflections
"Being Noticed"
From True Self to Subjective Identity
"Being Noticed"
Attracting the Boys
Costs of the Lack of Beauty
Costs of Beauty
Assaults and the Lens of White Supremacy
Resisting Oppressive Forms of Enculturation
Dauntai
Alysa
Nicole
"To Look Better"
Experiencing the Body through Dominant Cultural Storylines
Resisting Oppressive Forms of Enculturation
Reflections
"Color-Blind"
Noticing Difference, Pride, and Other Acts of Resistance
Dress
Body Shape
Hair
Language
The Lens of White Supremacy
Hair and Skin Color
Internalizing Cultural Representations of Blacks
"Talking Right"
Alysa's Color Blindness
A "Color-Blind" Researcher
Nurturing Critique and Agency
Traditions for Critique and Agency
Supporting Critique and Nurturing Agency
Tapping the Girls' Interests
Active and Respectful Listening
Strategic Questioning
Creating Safe Spaces for Conversation
Encouraging Imagination and Hope
If We Couldn't See
"Try to Imagine What a World Could Be Like..."
Suggestions for Future Curriculum
Integrating Curriculum
Bibliography