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Irish Fairy and Folk Tales

ISBN-10: 0812968557

ISBN-13: 9780812968552

Edition: 2003

Authors: W. B. Yeats, Paul Muldoon, William Butler Yeats

List price: $18.00
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Description:

Gathered by the renowned Irish poet, playwright, and essayist William Butler Yeats, the sixty-five tales and poems in this delightful collection uniquely capture the rich heritage of the Celtic imagination. Filled with legends of village ghosts, fairies, demons, witches, priests, and saints, these stories evoke both tender pathos and lighthearted mirth and embody what Yeats describes as “the very voice of the people, the very pulse of life.” “The impact of these tales doesn’t stop with Yeats, or Joyce, or Oscar Wilde,” writes Paul Muldoon in his Foreword, “for generations of readers in Ireland and throughout the world have found them flourishing like those persistent fairy thorns.” From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Book details

List price: $18.00
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 2/11/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 400
Size: 5.28" wide x 7.95" long x 0.91" tall
Weight: 0.660
Language: English

In his 1940 memorial lecture in Dublin, T. S. Eliot pronounced Yeats "one of those few whose history is the history of their own time, who are a part of the consciousness of an age which cannot be understood without them." Modern readers have increasingly agreed, and some now view Yeats even more than Eliot as the greatest modern poet in our language. Son of the painter John Butler Yeats, the poet divided his early years among Dublin, London, and the port of Sligo in western Ireland. Sligo furnished many of the familiar places in his poetry, among them the mountain Ben Bulben and the lake isle of Innisfree. Important influences on his early adulthood included his father, the writer and artist William Morris, the nationalist leader John O'Leary, and the occultist Madame Blavatsky. In 1889 he met the beautiful actress and Irish nationalist Maud Gonne; his long and frustrated love for her (she refused to marry him) would inspire some of his best work. Often and mistakenly viewed as merely a dreamy Celtic twilight, Yeats's work in the 1890s involved a complex attempt to unite his poetic, nationalist, and occult interests in line with his desire to "hammer [his] thoughts into unity." By the turn of the century, Yeats was immersed in the work with the Irish dramatic movement that would culminate in the founding of the Abbey Theatre in 1904 as a national theater for Ireland. Partly as a result of his theatrical experience, his poetry after 1900 began a complex "movement downwards upon life" fully evident in the Responsibilities volume of 1914. After that he published the extraordinary series of great volumes, all written after age 50, that continued until the end of his career. Widely read in various literary and philosophic traditions, Yeats owed his greatest debt to romantic poetry and once described himself, along with his coworkers John Synge and Lady Isabella Augusta Gregory, as a "last romantic." Yet he remained resolutely Irish as well and presented in his verse a persona bearing a subtle, idealized relationship to his everyday self. Political events such as the Easter Rising and the Irish civil war found their way into his poetry, as did personal ones such as marriage to the Englishwoman Georgiana "Georgie" Hyde-Lees in 1917, the birth of his children, and his sometime home in the Norman tower at Ballylee. So, too, did his increasing status as a public man, which included both the Nobel Prize in 1923 and a term as senator of the Irish Free State (1922--28). Yeats's disparate activities led to a lifelong quest for what he called "unity of being," which he pursued by "antinomies," or opposites. These included action and contemplation, life and art, fair and foul, and other famous pairs from his poetry. The most original poet of his age, he was also in ways the most traditional, and certainly the most substantial. His varied literary output included not only poems and plays but an array of prose forms such as essays, philosophy, fiction, reviews, speeches, and editions of folk and literary material. He also frequently revised his own poems, which exist in various published texts helpfully charted in the Variorum edition (1957).

Paul Muldoon was born in Northern Ireland in 1951. He lives with his wife, the novelist Jean Hanff Korelitz, & his two children in New Jersey, & teaches at Princeton University. In 1999 he was elected Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford.

Foreword
Introduction
The Fairies
Frank Martin and the Fairies
The Priest's Supper
The Fairy Well of Lagnanay
Teig O'Kane and the Corpse
Paddy Corcoran's Wife
Cusheen Loo
The White Trout; A Legend of Cong
The Fairy Thorn
The Legend of Knockgrafton
A Donegal Fairy
The Brewery of Egg-shells
The Fairy Nurse
Jamie Freel and the Young Lady
The Stolen Child
The Soul Cages
Flory Cantillon's Funeral
The Lepracaun; or, Fairy Shoemaker
Master and Man
Far Darrig in Donegal
The Pooka
The Piper and the Puca
Daniel O'Rourke
The Kildare Pooka
The Banshee
How Thomas Connolly met the Banshee
A Lamentation for the Death of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald
The Banshee of the Mac Carthys
A Dream
Grace Connor
A Legend of Tyrone
The Black Lamb
Song of the Ghost
The Radiant Boy
The Fate of Frank M'Kenna
Bewitched Butter (Donegal)
A Queen's County Witch
The Witch Hare
Bewitched Butter (Queen's County)
The Horned Women
The Witches' Excursion
The Confessions of Tom Bourke
The Pudding Bewitched
The Legend of O'Donoghue
Rent Day
Loughleagh (Lake of Healing)
Hy-Brasail - The Isle of the Blest
The Phantom Isle
The Priest's Soul
The Priest of Coloony
The Story of the Little Bird
Conversion of King Laoghaire's Daughters
King O'Toole and His Goose
The Demon Cat
The Long Spoon
The Countess Kathleen O'Shea
The Three Wishes
The Giant's Stairs
A Legend of Knockmany
The Twelve Wild Geese
The Lazy Beauty and Her Aunts
The Haughty Princess
The Enchantment of Gearoidh Iarla
Munachar and Manachar
Donald and His Neighbors
The Jackdaw
The Story of Conn-eda; Or the Golden Apples of Lough Erne
Notes