Skip to content

One Life at A Time, Please

ISBN-10: 0805006036

ISBN-13: 9780805006032

Edition: Revised 

Authors: Edward Abbey

List price: $19.00
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

From stories about cattlemen, fellow critics, his beloved desert, cities, and technocrats to thoughts on sin and redemption, this is one of our most treasured writers at the height of his powers.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $19.00
Publisher: Henry Holt & Company
Publication date: 2/15/1988
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 240
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.594
Language: English

Edward Abbey was born January 29, 1927 in Indiana, Pennsylvania, and grew up in nearby Home. After military service in Naples, Italy, from 1945-47, he enrolled in Indiana University of Pennsylvania for a year before traveling to the West. He fell in love with the desert Southwest and eventually attended the University of New Mexico, where he obtained both graduate and post-graduate degrees. Abbey was a Fulbright Fellow from 1951-52. Abbey was an anarchist and a radical environmentalist; these positions are reflected in his writings. His novel Fire on the Mountain won the Western Heritage Award for Best Novel in 1963. Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, considered by many to be his best work, is nonfiction that reflects Abbey's love for the American Southwest and draws on his experiences as a park ranger. Among his best-known works are The Brave Cowboy (1956), The Monkey Wrench Gang (1975), and The Fool's Progress (1988). In 1966 The Brave Cowboy was made into a movie titled Lonely Are the Brave, starring Kirk Douglas. Two collections of essays have been published since his death in 1989: Confessions of a Barbarian in 1994 and The Serpents of Paradise the following year. In 1987, Abbey was offered the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award, but he declined. Abbey died in March 1989, near Tucson, Arizona, from complications following surgery. He did not want a traditional burial but rather requested to be buried in the Arizona desert, where he could nourish the earth which had been the subject of so many of his works.

Preliminary Remarks
Politics
Free Speech: The Cowboy and His Cow
Arizona: How Big is Big Enough?
Theory of Anarchy
Eco-Defense
Blood Sport
Immigration and Liberal Taboos
Wild Horses
Travel
A San Francisco Journal
Lake Powell by Houseboat
River Solitaire: A Daybook
River of No Return
Forty Years as a Canyoneer
Big Bend
TV Show: Out There in the Rocks
Round River Rendezvous: The Rio Grande
Books and Art
A Writer's Credo
Mr Krutch
The Remington Studio
The Future of Sex: A Reaction to a Pair of Books-Brownmiller's Femininity and Steinem's Outrageous Acts
Emerson
Nature Love
Sportsmen