Skip to content

Introduction to Law Enforcement An Insider's View

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0757508243

ISBN-13: 9780757508240

Edition: 2nd 2004 (Revised)

Authors: Bill Doerner

List price: $73.45
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

This text covers the context of law enforcement, selection and hiring practices, becoming a police officer, and criminal and constitutional law, and looks at issues and procedures the police deal with on and off the beat, including arrests, use of force, stress, and regulating police behavior. Learning features include chapter objectives and summar
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $73.45
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company
Publication date: 1/23/2004
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 526
Weight: 4.972
Language: English

List of Figuresp. xv
List of Tablesp. xviii
The Context of Law Enforcementp. 1
Early Efforts at Policingp. 3
Maintaining Social Orderp. 5
Standards of Behaviorp. 5
Controlling Social Behaviorp. 6
Types of Societyp. 8
Societal Developmentp. 9
Early English Law Enforcementp. 10
The Challenge of Urban Growthp. 11
A Step toward Paid Police Protectionp. 12
Sir Robert Peel and the Bobbiesp. 13
Law Enforcement in Developing Americap. 15
Law and Order on the Frontierp. 16
Vigilante Policingp. 16
The Rise of Private Securityp. 18
Critical Issues in 20th Century Law Enforcementp. 27
The Wickersham Commissionp. 29
The 1967 President's Commissionp. 32
The Kerner Reportp. 34
Standards and Goalsp. 36
The Knapp Commissionp. 39
Contemporary Critical Incidentsp. 42
The Mollen Reportp. 42
The Christopher Reportp. 44
The Sequel to the Christopher Reportp. 46
The Siege at Wacop. 47
Racial Profilingp. 48
The Structure of American Law Enforcementp. 59
The American Police Systemp. 61
The Federal Levelp. 63
Federal Officersp. 63
Department of Justice Agenciesp. 63
Department of the Treasury Agenciesp. 67
Other Federal Agenciesp. 67
The State Levelp. 68
The Local Levelp. 68
City Police Departmentsp. 69
County Sheriffs' Officesp. 72
Some Observationsp. 72
Special Jurisdiction Agenciesp. 75
Agency Organizational Structurep. 76
The Budget Picturep. 79
Better Resource Managementp. 80
Civilianizationp. 80
Assets Forfeiturep. 84
Computerization for Patrol Officersp. 90
Behind the Badgep. 103
Selection and Hiring Practicesp. 107
Police Officer Selectionp. 109
The Selection Processp. 111
The Applicationp. 111
The Written Psychological Examp. 112
The Background Investigationp. 116
Polygraph Testingp. 117
The Psychological Interviewp. 117
A Closer Look at Psychological Testingp. 118
Subjective Performance Measuresp. 118
Objective Performance Measuresp. 119
Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scalesp. 119
Explaining the Gapp. 120
The Oral Board Interviewp. 120
The Eligibility Listp. 124
The Medical Checkp. 124
Other Hiring Issuesp. 125
Higher Education for Copsp. 126
Are College-Educated Recruits Better?p. 126
Do College-Educated Cops Perform Better?p. 128
Whom Are Agencies Hiring?p. 129
Black Police Officersp. 130
Black Representation in Policingp. 130
Reaction to Black Officersp. 133
Female Patrol Officersp. 134
Initial Barriersp. 135
Are Females Good Recruits?p. 136
Female Officer Performancep. 136
Reaction to Female Officersp. 138
The Choicep. 138
The Current Market Dilemmap. 141
Becoming a Copp. 159
Pre-Entry: Reasons for Becoming a Police Officerp. 162
Admittance: Police Minimum Standardsp. 163
The President's Commissionp. 163
The National Advisory Commissionp. 164
The State Responsep. 165
Basic Police Trainingp. 165
Career Development Incentivesp. 167
Change: Post-Academy Trainingp. 172
A Typical Field Training Officer Programp. 173
Program Descriptionp. 174
Performance Evaluationp. 174
Does the FTO Program Remove Barriers?p. 178
Officer Reaction to FTO Trainingp. 180
The Field Experiencep. 181
Continuance: Adaptation to the Police Worldp. 183
Another Look at Psychological Testingp. 183
Attitudinal Changep. 185
Cynicismp. 186
Stages of Cynicismp. 186
Types of Cynicismp. 187
The Police "Working Personality"p. 188
The Police Subculturep. 190
Lessons in Criminal Lawp. 201
The Nature of Criminal Lawp. 203
Violent Offensesp. 205
Homicidep. 205
Justifiable Homicidep. 205
Excusable Homicidep. 205
Murderp. 206
Manslaughterp. 206
The Felony-Murder Rulep. 208
Assault and Batteryp. 209
Sexual Batteryp. 210
Robberyp. 211
Kidnapping and False Imprisonmentp. 212
Property Offensesp. 213
Larceny-Theftp. 213
Burglaryp. 214
Vandalismp. 216
Other Considerationsp. 216
Lessons in Constitutional Lawp. 225
Searches, Seizures, and Warrantsp. 227
Warrantless Searches and Seizuresp. 229
Search Incidental to Arrestp. 230
Automobile Searchesp. 230
Plain Viewp. 232
Exigent Circumstancesp. 234
Hot Pursuitp. 235
Evidence Preservationp. 235
Public Safetyp. 235
Stop and Friskp. 237
Consentp. 240
Abandonmentp. 243
Inventoryp. 244
Interrogationp. 246
Past Interrogation Practicesp. 247
The Wickersham Commissionp. 247
Continued Use of Third-Degree Tacticsp. 248
Escobedo v. Illinoisp. 249
Miranda v. Arizonap. 250
The Legal Legacy of Mirandap. 251
Custodial Interrogationsp. 251
Failure to Warnp. 252
Invocation of Mirandap. 253
The Diffusion of Knowledge: A Bottleneckp. 254
On the Streetsp. 265
The Arrest Decisionp. 267
Full versus Selective Enforcementp. 269
Reasons for Police Discretionp. 271
Unclear Lawsp. 271
Nuisance Behaviorp. 272
Broad Statutesp. 272
Moral Standardsp. 272
Outdated Lawsp. 273
Defining Discretionp. 273
Handling Calls for Servicep. 274
Police Operators and Dispatchersp. 274
Handling Calls in the Fieldp. 277
Observational Studiesp. 277
Controlling the Callp. 280
Putting It Togetherp. 281
The Arrest Decisionp. 282
Field Encounter Studiesp. 282
Simulation Studiesp. 287
Police Bias in the Arrest Decisionp. 288
Racismp. 288
Early Studiesp. 289
Later Studiesp. 290
Sexismp. 291
Early Studiesp. 292
Later Studiesp. 292
A Critiquep. 293
Controlling Police Discretionp. 295
The Locus of Changep. 295
The Policy Formulation Processp. 296
Styles of Policingp. 309
Police Typologiesp. 311
Wilson: Varieties of Police Behaviorp. 312
White: Professionalizationp. 314
Broderick: Due Process and Social Orderp. 318
Muir: Passion and Perspectivep. 321
Brown: Working the Streetp. 324
Testing Police Typologiesp. 327
Application of Muir's Typologyp. 327
Synthesizing Police Typologiesp. 328
Individual and Organizational Stylesp. 328
Some Final Thoughtsp. 329
Use of Forcep. 335
Accidental Deaths in the Line of Dutyp. 337
Assaults in the Line of Dutyp. 338
Murders in the Line of Dutyp. 339
Officers Murderedp. 340
Police Killersp. 341
Circumstancesp. 342
Off-Duty Interventionp. 343
Trends in Police Murdersp. 344
The Ecology of Police Murdersp. 347
Police Murders and Community Violencep. 348
The Death Penalty as Protectionp. 348
Death Benefit Provisionsp. 349
Police-Caused Deathsp. 350
Incidencep. 351
Opponent Racep. 353
The Hazard Hypothesisp. 354
Elective versus Non-Elective Shootingsp. 354
Social Disparityp. 355
Authorization of Deadly Forcep. 356
The Fleeing Felon Rulep. 356
An Impetus for Changep. 357
Tennessee v. Garnerp. 359
Post-Garner Developmentsp. 361
Deadly Force Policy Revisionsp. 362
Rethinking Use-of-Force Strategiesp. 362
Less-Lethal Weaponryp. 365
Justifying the Use of Forcep. 369
The Police Organizationp. 369
Police Officersp. 370
Prospective Beliefsp. 371
Retrospective Beliefsp. 371
Types of Forcep. 372
Off the Streetsp. 383
Stress-The Occupational Scourge?p. 385
Defining Stressp. 387
Types of Stressp. 388
The Stress Reaction Cyclep. 388
Sources of Police Stressp. 390
Intra-Individual Sourcesp. 390
Interpersonal Sourcesp. 391
Organizational Sourcesp. 394
Shift Workp. 394
Equipmentp. 395
Citizen Complaintsp. 395
Environmental Sourcesp. 396
The Communityp. 396
The Criminal Justice Systemp. 396
The Threat of Dangerp. 398
The Consequences of Police Stressp. 400
Morbidity and Mortalityp. 400
Alcohol Abusep. 402
Suicidep. 404
Marital Tensionsp. 405
Another Outlook on Police Stressp. 407
Stress Managementp. 411
Eliminating Stressorsp. 411
Learning to Copep. 413
Reaching Outp. 414
Regulating Police Behaviorp. 427
The Need for Policy Guidelinesp. 429
Contents of Policy Guidelinesp. 431
Secondary Employment as an Examplep. 432
Internal Affairsp. 434
Types of Disciplinary Actionsp. 435
Procedural Protectionsp. 436
Decertificationp. 441
External Sources of Reliefp. 446
Federal Civil Rights Violationsp. 446
Tort Actions against the Policep. 448
Intentional Tortp. 448
Negligence Tortp. 449
Do These Strategies Work?p. 449
Profession or Occupationp. 457
The Meaning of "Profession"p. 460
A Specialized Body of Knowledgep. 460
Licensingp. 461
Authority and Autonomyp. 462
Altruismp. 463
A Code of Ethicsp. 463
A Final Notep. 463
Barriers to Professional Statusp. 465
"Dirty Work"p. 465
The Closed Police Worldp. 466
Police Unionizationp. 467
Modern Police Strikesp. 468
Public Reactionp. 470
Crime during Strikesp. 471
Preventing Future Strikesp. 472
Upgrading Police Agenciesp. 474
The Quest for Police Professionalismp. 476
Professionalizing Police Officersp. 477
Transforming the FBI into an Elitep. 478
Professionalism Taking Rootp. 478
The Journey Aheadp. 478
Salariesp. 479
Opportunities for Promotionp. 479
Career Mobilityp. 480
Leadershipp. 481
Retirementp. 491
Issues in Agingp. 494
The Retirement Decisionp. 494
The Second Careerp. 497
Health Concernsp. 499
Phases of Retirementp. 500
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.