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How to Write a Business Plan

ISBN-10: 074946710X

ISBN-13: 9780749467104

Edition: 4th 2013

Authors: Brian Finch

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Description:

Starting with the premise that there's only one chance to make a good impression,How to Write a Business Plancovers all the issues involved in producing a business plan – from profiling competitors and forecasting market development, to the importance of providing clear and concise financial information.  It also includes a full glossary, case histories and a detailed section on the related issue of how a company can best use internal business plans. New in this edition are summaries at the end of each chapter, updated advice on producing cash and forecasts and a more detailed questionnaire to help with forecasting.
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Book details

Edition: 4th
Copyright year: 2013
Publisher: Kogan Page, Limited
Publication date: 3/3/2013
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 192
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.50" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.484
Language: English

Brian Finch has been Director of Business Development for large UK public companies, as well as co-founder and Finance Director of an SME retail business with substantial internet trading. By background an engineer and certified accountant, he has an MBA from the London Business School. He is the author of a number of self-development books, many translated around the world, including The Times Guide to How To Write a Business Plan 3 rd Edition, (Kogan Page).

Introduction
The structure of the plan
Using appendices
Summary
The business background
The business
What is the product or service?
The markets
Supply
How did you get here?
The market
Overview
Market structure
Competitors
Customers
Distribution
Trends
Competitive advantage
Market segmentation
Differentiation
Pricing
Barriers to entry
Big changes and new technologies
Examples of market change
Mixed strategies
Operations
Differencies
Processes
Control
Experience
Supply
Systems
Location and environment
Regulatory control
Management
The essential difference
What skills are required?
Organization structure
Demonstrating control
Management
The proposal
Explain
The proposition
Why will you succeed?
Ask for what you want!
What have you invested?
Closing the deal
The exit
The forecast
The sales forecast
Costs
The five-year forecast
Reviewing the plan
Sensitivity
Key assumptions
Explain important points
Financial information
Profit and loss account
Cash forecast
Sensitivity
Break-even
Funding
Reconciling and checking
Timing
Balance sheet
Trends
Some important terms
Risks
Legal issues and confidentiality
Confidentiality
Selling your business
Explain why you are selling
Emphasize the great opportunities for the business
Don't waste time illustrating that sudden upturn in business expected imminently
Do you include a forecast?
Who is the buyer?
Holding back information
Due diligence
Improve performance with a business plan
Planning is not budgeting
Strategic vision and action
Creating strategy
Planning for people
Practicalities
Using business plans for bidding
Appendices
The confidentiality letter
Reconciling profit and cash flow
The cash forecast
Glossary