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Gene Regulation A Eukaryotic Perspective

ISBN-10: 0748765301

ISBN-13: 9780748765300

Edition: 4th 2002 (Revised)

Authors: David S. Latchman

List price: $90.00
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Description:

In this fourth edition of "Gene Regulation: A Eukaryotic Perspective," the references have been updated. It is a concise text with many examples and a full color section. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students studying genetics, biochemistry, biology, biotechnology and medicine should find all they need on this subject in this text.
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Book details

List price: $90.00
Edition: 4th
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Publication date: 1/1/2002
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 352
Size: 7.25" wide x 9.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.782
Language: English

Preface to the fourth edition
Preface to the first edition
Preface to the second edition
Preface to the third edition
Acknowledgements
Tissue-specific expression of proteins and messenger RNAs
Introduction
Tissue-specific expression of proteins
Specific methods for studying the protein composition of tissues
General methods for studying the protein composition of tissues
Tissue-specific expression of messenger RNAs
Specific methods for studying the mRNAs expressed in different tissues
General methods for studying the mRNAs expressed in different tissues
Conclusions
References
The DNA of different cell types is similar in both amount and type
Introduction
DNA loss
DNA loss as a mechanism of gene regulation
Chromosomal studies
Functional studies
Molecular studies
DNA amplification
DNA amplification as a mechanism of gene regulation
Chromosomal studies
Molecular studies
DNA rearrangement
Conclusions
References
Gene Expression
Levels of gene regulation
Transcription
RNA polymerase I
RNA polymerase III
RNA polymerase II
Common features of transcription by the three RNA polymerases
Post transcriptional events
Capping
Polyadenylation
RNA splicing
Coupling of transcription and RNA processing within the nucleus
RNA transport
Translation
Conclusions
References
Regulation at transcription
Introduction
Evidence for transcriptional regulation
Evidence from studies of nuclear RNA
Evidence from pulse-labelling studies
Evidence from nuclear run-on assays
Evidence from polytene chromosomes
Regulation at transcriptional elongation
Initiation of transcription
Transcriptional elongation
Conclusions
References
Post-transcriptional regulation
Regulation after transcription?
Regulation of RNA splicing
RNA splicing
Alternative RNA splicing
Mechanism of alternative RNA splicing
Generality of alternative RNA splicing
RNA editing
Regulation of RNA transport
Transport from nucleus to cytoplasm
Transport within the cytoplasm
Regulation of RNA stability
Cases of regulation by alterations in RNA stability
Mechanisms of stability regulation
Role of stability changes in regulation of gene expression
Regulation of translation
Cases of translational control
Mechanism of translational control
Significance of translational control
Conclusions
References
Transcriptional control-chromatin structure
Introduction
Commitment to the differentiated state and its stability
Chromatin structure
Changes in chromatin structure in active or potentially active genes
Active DNA is organised in a nucleosomal structure
Sensitivity of active chromatin to DNAase I digestion
Alterations in DNA methylation in active or potentially active genes
Nature of DNA methylation
Evidence that DNA methylation plays a role in regulating chromatin structure
Mechanism by which DNA methylation affects chromatin structure
Modification of histones in the chromatin of active or potentially active genes
Acetylation
Other histone modifications
Changes in chromatin structure in the regulatory regions of active or potentially active genes
DNAase I hypersensitive sites
Chromatin remodelling by proteins capable of displacing nucleosomes or altering their structure
Other situations in which chromatin structure is regulated
X-chromosome inactivation
Genomic imprinting
Conclusions
References
Transcriptional control-DNA sequence elements
Introduction
Relationship of gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes
Co-ordinately regulated genes are not linked in eukaryotes
The Britten and Davidson model for the co-ordinate regulation of unlinked genes
Short sequence elements located within or adjacent to the gene promoter
Short regulatory elements
The 70 kDa heat-shock protein gene
Other response elements
DNA binding by short sequence elements
Mechanism of action of promoter regulatory elements
Enhancers
Regulatory sequences that act at a distance
Tissue-specific activity of enhancers
Mechanism of action of enhancers
Negatively acting sequence elements
Silencers
Insulators
Locus control regions
The locus control region
Mechanism of action of LCRs
Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerases I and III
Conclusions
References
Transcriptional control-transcription factors
Introduction
DNA binding by transcription factors
Introduction
The helix-turn-helix motif
The zinc finger motif
The leucine zipper, the helix-loop-helix motif and the basic DNA-binding domain
Other DNA-binding domains
Regulation of transcription
Introduction
Activation domains
How is transcription activated?
Repression of transcription
What regulates the regulators?
Introduction
Regulated synthesis of transcription factors
Regulated activity of transcription factors
Conclusions
References
Gene regulation and human disease
Gene regulation and human disease
Proto-oncogenes
Elevated expression of oncogenes
Transcription factors as oncogenes
Fos, Jun and AP1
v-erbA and the thyroid hormone receptor
Other transcription-factor-related oncogenes
Anti-oncogenes
Nature of anti-oncogenes
p53
The Retinoblastoma protein
Other anti-oncogene transcription factors
Conclusions
References
Conclusions and future prospects
Index