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Legend of the Baal-Shem

ISBN-10: 0691043892

ISBN-13: 9780691043890

Edition: 1995

Authors: Martin Buber, Maurice Friedman

List price: $29.95
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Description:

The Jewish philosopher Martin Buber spoke directly to the most profound human concerns in all his works, including his discussions of Hasidism, a mystical-religious movement founded in Eastern Europe by Israel ben Eliezer, called the Baal-Shem (the Master of God's Name). Living in the first part of the eighteenth century in Podolia and Wolhynia, the Baal-Shem braved scorn and rejection from the rabbinical establishment and attracted followers from among the common people, the poor, and the mystically inclined. Here Buber offers a sensitive and intuitive account of Hasidism, followed by twenty stories about the life of the Baal-Shem. This book is the earliest and one of the most delightful of Buber's seven volumes on Hasidism and can be read not only as a collection of myth but as a key to understanding the central theme of Buber's thought: the I-Thou, or dialogical, relationship. "All positive religion rests on an enormous simplification of the manifold and wildly engulfing forces that invade us: it is the subduing of the fullness of existence. All myth, in contrast, is the expression of the fullness of existence, its image, its sign; it drinks incessantly from the gushing fountains of life."--Martin Buber, from the introduction
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Book details

List price: $29.95
Copyright year: 1995
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 5/7/1995
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 224
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.770

Martin Buber was born in Vienna, the son of Solomon Buber, a scholar of Midrashic and medieval literature. Martin Buber studied at the universities of Vienna, Leipzig, Zurich, and Berlin, under Wilhelm Dilthey and Georg Simmel. As a young student, he joined the Zionist movement, advocating the renewal of Jewish culture as opposed to Theodor Herzl's political Zionism. At age 26 he became interested in Hasidic thought and translated the tales of Nahman of Bratslav. Hasidism had a profound impact on Buber's thought. He credited it as being the inspiration for his theories of spirituality, community, and dialogue. Buber is responsible for bringing Hasidism to the attention of young German intellectuals who previously had scorned it as the product of ignorant eastern European Jewish peasants. Buber also wrote about utopian socialism, education, Zionism, and respect for the Palestinian Arabs, and, with Franz Rosenzweig, he translated the Bible. He was appointed to a professorship at the University of Frankfurt in 1925, but, when the Nazis came to power, he received an appointment at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Buber died in 1965.

Foreword
Introduction: The Life of the Hasidim
The Werewolf
The Prince of Fire
The Revelation
The Martyrs and the
Revenge
The Heavenly Journey
Jerusalem
Saul and David
The Prayer-Book
The Judgement
The Forgotten Story
The Soul Which Descended
The Psalm-Singer
The Disturbed Sabbath
The Conversion
The Return
From Strength to Strength
The Threefold Laugh
The Language of the Birds
The Call
The Shepherd
Glossary