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Attacking Faulty Reasoning A Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments

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ISBN-10: 0534217508

ISBN-13: 9780534217501

Edition: 3rd 1995

Authors: T. Edward Damer

List price: $41.95
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Book details

List price: $41.95
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 1995
Publisher: Wadsworth
Publication date: 7/20/1994
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 200
Size: 6.03" wide x 9.01" long x 0.47" tall
Weight: 0.880
Language: English

T. Edward Damer received his Ph.D. from Boston University and currently teaches at Emory and Henry College.

Preface
Introduction
Reasons for Using Good Arguments
Goals of the Text
A Code of Intellectual Conduct
A Code of Conduct for Effective Rational Discussion
The Fallibility Principle
The Truth-Seeking Principle
The Clarity Principle
The Burden of Proof Principle
The Principle of Charity
The Relevance Principle
The Acceptability Principle
The Sufficiency Principle
The Rebuttal Principle
The Resolution Principle
The Suspension of Judgment Principle
The Reconsideration Principle
The Fallibility Principle
The Truth-Seeking Principle
The Clarity Principle
Guide Questions
What is an Argument?
An Argument Is a Claim Supported by Other Claims
Distinguishing Argument from Opinion
The Burden of Proof Principle
The Standard Form of an Argument
The Principle of Charity
Deductive Versus Inductive Strength of Arguments
Moral Arguments
Guide Questions
What is a Good Argument?
A Good Argument Must Meet Four Criteria
The Relevance Principle
The Acceptability Principle
Criteria of Acceptability
Conditions of Unacceptability
The Sufficiency Principle
The Rebuttal Principle
Making Arguments Stronger
Applying the Criteria to Arguments
Constructing Good Arguments
The Resolution Principle
The Suspension of Judgment Principle
The Reconsideration Principle
Guide Questions
What is a Fallacy?
A Fallacy Is a Violation of a Criterion of a Good Argument
Named Versus Unnamed Fallacies
Organization of the Fallacies
Attacking the Fallacy
Rules of the Game
Guide Questions
Fallacies That Violate the Relevance Criterion
Fallacies of Irrelevance
Irrelevant or Questionable Authority
Appeal to Common Opinion
Genetic Fallacy
Rationalization
Drawing the Wrong Conclusion
Using the Wrong Reasons
Exercises
Irrelevant Emotional Appeals
Appeal to Pity
Appeal to Force or Threat
Appeal to Tradition
Appeal to Personal Circumstances
Exploitation of Strong Feelings
Use of Flattery
Assigning Guilt by Association
Exercises
Additional Exercises
Fallacies That Violate the Acceptability Criterion
Fallacies of Linguistic Confusion
Equivocation
Ambiguity
Improper Accent
Illicit Contrast
Argument by Innuendo
Misuse of a Vague Expression
Distinction Without a Difference
Exercises
Begging-the-Question Fallacies
Arguing in a Circle
Question-Begging Language
Complex Question
Leading Question
Question-Begging Definition
Exercises
Unwarranted Assumption Fallacies
Fallacy of the Continuum
Fallacy of Composition
Fallacy of Division
False Alternatives
Is-Ought Fallacy
Wishful Thinking
Misuse of a Principle
Fallacy of the Mean
Faulty Analogy
Fallacy of Novelty
Exercises
Additional Exercises
Fallacies That Violate the Sufficiency Criterion
Fallacies of Missing Evidence
Insufficient Sample
Unrepresentative Data
Arguing from Ignorance
Contrary-to-Fact Hypothesis
Fallacy of Popular Wisdom
Inference from a Name or Description
Fallacy of Impossible Precision
Special Pleading
Omission of Key Evidence
Exercises
Causal Fallacies
Confusion of a Necessary with a Sufficient Condition
Causal Oversimplification
Post Hoc Fallacy
Confusion of Cause and Effect
Neglect of a Common Cause
Domino Fallacy
Gambler's Fallacy
Exercises
Additional Exercises
Fallacies That Violate the Rebuttal Criterion
Fallacies of Counterevidence
Denying the Counterevidence
Ignoring the Counterevidence
Exercises
Ad Hominem Fallacies
Abusive Ad Hominem
Poisoning the Well
Tu Quoque Fallacy
Exercises
Fallacies of Diversion
Attacking a Straw Man
Trivial Objections
Red Herring
Diversionary Humor or Ridicule
Exercises
Additional Exercises
Glossary of Fallacies
Answers to Selected Exercises
Index