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From Apology to Utopia The Structure of International Legal Argument

ISBN-10: 0521838061

ISBN-13: 9780521838061

Edition: 2005

Authors: Martti Koskenniemi

List price: $160.00
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Description:

Drawing from a range of materials, Martti Koskenniemi demonstrates how international law becomes vulnerable to the contrasting criticisms of being either an irrelevant moralist Utopia or a manipulable faade for State interests. He examines the conflicts inherent in international law--sources, sovereignty, 'custom' and 'world order--and shows how legal discourse about such subjects can be described in terms of a small number of argumentative rules. Originally published in English in Finland in 1989, this reissue includes a newly written Epilogue by the author.
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Book details

List price: $160.00
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 2/2/2006
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 704
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 1.75" tall
Weight: 2.750
Language: English

Martti Koskenniemi is Professor of International Law at the University of Helsinki and Director of the Erik Castren Institute of International Law and Human Rights. He worked as diplomat with the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs from 1978 to 1994, representing Finland in a number of international institutions and conferences. As member of the UN International Law Commission (2002-6) he chaired the Study group on the 'Fragmentation of International Law'. He has written widely on international law topics and his present research interests cover the theory and history of the field.

Objectivity in international law: conventional dilemmas
Doctrinal history: the liberal doctrine of politics and its effect on international law
The structure of modern doctrines
Sovereignty
Sources
Custom
Variations of world order: the structure of international legal argument
Beyond objectivism
Epilogue
Bibliography and table of cases