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Making Sense of Heritability

ISBN-10: 052182818X

ISBN-13: 9780521828185

Edition: 2005

Authors: Neven Sesardic

List price: $124.00
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Description:

Neven Sesardic defends the view that it is both possible and useful to measure the separate contributions of heredity and environment to the explanation of human psychological differences. He critically examines the view--very widely accepted by scientists, social scientists and philosophers of science--that heritability estimates have no causal implications and are devoid of any interest and subjects the arguments to close philosophical scrutiny. His conclusion is that anti-heritability arguments are based on conceptual confusions and misunderstandings of behavioral genetics.
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Book details

List price: $124.00
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 10/13/2005
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 282
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.50" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

David Hudson is a writer and photographer specializing in field sports and has written a number of books on shooting and gundogs. He lives in southern Scotland.

List of figures
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The nature-nurture debate: a premature burial?
A convenient jingle of words
No fair hearing for Francis Galton
Heritability 101
Can monomorphic traits be heritable?
Philosophers at work: caveat lector!
A tangle of interactions: separating genetic and environmental influences
Two concepts of interaction
The rectangle analogy
Lewontin against ANOVA
Non-additivity
Locality
Causal irrelevance
The second look at interactions
Lost in correlations? Direct and indirect genetic causes
The conceptual route: a Pickwickian notion?
The methodological route: tracing the paths of causality
The sociologist's fallacy
From individuals to groups: genetics and race
The "master argument"
VE theories
X-factor theories
Unfair to facts
The hereditarian strikes back
Genes and malleability
Genetic and environmental causation
PKU
Local modifiability and modifiability "in principle"
Comparing apples and oranges
A clumsy attempt to appease the critics
Limits to egalitarianism
Science and sensitivity
Mistaken because politically motivated
Politically motivated because mistaken
Consequential fallacy
Double standards
From "is" to "ought," non-fallaciously
Looking into the abyss
From groups to individuals
Fair, therefore biased?
Conclusion
References
Index