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Reactionary Modernism Technology, Culture, and Politics in Weimar and the Third Reich

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ISBN-10: 0521338336

ISBN-13: 9780521338332

Edition: N/A

Authors: Jeffrey Herf

List price: $29.99
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Description:

In a unique application of critical theory to the study of the role of ideology in politics, Jeffrey Herf explores the paradox inherent in the German fascists' rejection of the rationalism of the Enlightenment while fully embracing modern technology. He documents evidence of a cultural tradition he calls 'reactionary modernism' found in the writings of German engineers and of the major intellectuals of the. Weimar right: Ernst Juenger, Oswald Spengler, Werner Sombart, Hans Freyer, Carl Schmitt, and Martin Heidegger. The book shows how German nationalism and later National Socialism created what Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's propaganda minister, called the 'steel-like romanticism of the twentieth century'. By associating technology with the Germans, rather than the Jews, with beautiful form rather than the formlessness of the market, and with a strong state rather than a predominance of economic values and institutions, these right-wing intellectuals reconciled Germany's strength with its romantic soul and national identity.
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Book details

List price: $29.99
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 5/31/1986
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 264
Size: 6.30" wide x 9.33" long x 0.71" tall
Weight: 1.056
Language: English

Jeffrey Herfis a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Maryland in College Park.

Preface
The paradox of reactionary modernism
The conservative revolution of Weimar
Oswald Spengler: bourgeois antinomies, reactionary reconciliations
Ernest Jnnger's magical realism
Technology and three mandarin thinkers
Werner Sombart: technology and the Jewish question
Engineers as ideologues
Reactionary modernism in the Third Reich
Conclusion
Bibliographical essay
Index