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Darwinism's Struggle for Survival Heredity and the Hypothesis of Natural Selection

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ISBN-10: 0521039673

ISBN-13: 9780521039673

Edition: N/A

Authors: Jean Gayon, Matthew Cobb

List price: $96.99
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Description:

In Darwinism's Struggle for Survival Jean Gayon offers a philosophical interpretation of the history of theoretical Darwinism. He begins by examining the different forms taken by the hypothesis of natural selection in the nineteenth century (Darwin, Wallace, Galton) and the major difficulties that it encountered, particularly with regard to its compatibility with the theory of heredity. He then shows how these difficulties were overcome during the seventy years that followed the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species, and he concludes by analyzing the major features of the genetic theory of natural selection, as it developed from 1920 to 1960. This rich and wide-ranging study will appeal to philosophers and historians of science and to evolutionary biologists.
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Book details

List price: $96.99
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 8/16/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 536
Size: 5.98" wide x 8.98" long x 1.18" tall
Weight: 1.760
Language: English

MATTHEW COBB is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester. He has translated five books from French into English, and spent most of his adult life as a researcher in Paris, before returning to the UK in 2002.

List of illustrations
Preface to the English edition
Introduction
The Darwinian hypothesis
Wallace and Darwin: a disagreement and its meaning
The ontology of selection
Jenkin's objections, Darwin's dilemma
Selection faced with the challenge of heredity: sixty years of principled crisis
Galton and the concept of heredity
Post-Darwinian views of selection and regression
The strategy of indirect corroboration: the case of mimicry
The search for direct proof: biometry
Establishing the possibility of natural selection: the confrontation of Darwinism and Mendelism
The genetic theory of selection
The place of selection in theoretical population genetics
The empirical and the formal
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index