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Black Revolution on Campus

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ISBN-10: 0520269225

ISBN-13: 9780520269224

Edition: 2012

Authors: Martha Biondi

List price: $85.00
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Description:

The Black Revolution on Campusis the definitive account of an extraordinary but forgotten chapter of the black freedom struggle. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Black students organized hundreds of protests that sparked a period of crackdown, negotiation, and reform that profoundly transformed college life. At stake was the very mission of higher education. Black students demanded that public universities serve their communities; that private universities rethink the mission of elite education; and that black colleges embrace self-determination and resist the threat of integration. Most crucially, black students demanded a role in the definition of scholarly knowledge.Martha Biondi…    
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Book details

List price: $85.00
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: University of California Press
Publication date: 8/6/2012
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 366
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

Martha Biondi is Associate Professor of African-American Studies and History at Northwestern University.

List of Illustrations
Introduction. The Black Revolution on Campus
Moving toward Blackness: The Rise of Black Power on Campus
A Revolution Is Beginning: The Strike at San Francisco State
A Turbulent Era of Transition: Black Students and a New Chicago
Brooklyn College Belongs to Us: The Transformation of Higher Education in New York City
Toward a Black University: Radicalism, Repression, and Reform at Historically Black Colleges
The Counterrevolution on Campus: Why Was Black Studies So Controversial?
The Black Revolution Off-Campus
What Happened to Black Studies?
Conclusion. Reflections on the Movement and Its Legacy
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Acknowledgments
Photo Credits
Index