Skip to content

Violence of Liberation Gender and Tibetan Buddhist Revival in Post-Mao China

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0520250605

ISBN-13: 9780520250604

Edition: 2007

Authors: Charlene E. Makley

List price: $31.95
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

This wide-ranging, keenly observed study provides a groundbreaking account of the highly contested process through which the Tibetan Buddhist region of Labrang became incorporated into the People's Republic of China. Drawing from 13 years of archival research and fieldwork in and around the famous Geluk sect Tibetan Buddhist monastery, Charlene Makley situates the process of incorporation in the violent upheavals of Maoist socialist transformation that took place from 1950 through the 1970s and in the transition to globalization via Deng Xiaoping's capitalist market forms of the 1980s and 1990s. Synthesizing social theory drawn from anthropology, political economy, gender studies, and linguistic anthropology, she finds that incorporation had quite different effects for Tibetan men and women, creating painful dilemmas across generations. Her innovative study provides a sensitive and controversial examination of many different Tibetan voices and opens a new perspective on Sino-Tibetan relations in this important frontier region.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $31.95
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: University of California Press
Publication date: 12/5/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 400
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.50" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.188
Language: English

Charlene E. Makley is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Reed College.

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Notes on Transliteration
Abbreviations
Introduction: Bodies of Power
Fatherlands: Mapping Masculinities
Father State: Socialist Transformation and Gendered Historiography
Mother Home: Circumarabulation, Femininities, and the Ambiguous Mobility of Women
Consuming Women: Consumption, Sexual Politics, and the Dangers of Mixing
Monks Are Men Too: Domesticating Monastic Subjects-
Epilogue: Quandaries of Agency
Notes
References Cited
Index