Bluebeard's Castle Vocal Score

ISBN-10: 0486416879

ISBN-13: 9780486416878

Edition: N/A

Authors: Bela Bartok

List price: $17.95 Buy it from $8.28
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description:

A musical volcano that erupts for 60 minutes of compressed tragedy,” as Zoltaacute;n Kodaacute;ly dubbed it, this one-act opera from 1911—Bartoacute;k’s only foray into the genre—revolves around a psychological duel between a nervous bride and her notorious husband. Featuring a libretto by the distinguished writer Beacute;la Balaacute;zs, Bluebeard’s Castle is considered the greatest Hungarian opera. For this new vocal-score edition, Stanley Appelbaum has provided an informative introduction and a full English synopsis based on the original Hungarian text.
Used Starting from $8.28
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Customers also bought
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $17.95
Publisher: Dover Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 7/17/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 96
Size: 7.25" wide x 10.25" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.550

Bela Bartok, one of the outstanding composers of the twentieth century, was born in Hungary in 1881. When he was five years old, his mother began to teach him to play the piano. By the age of nine, he had begun to compose his own music. Between 1899 and 1903, he attended the Academy of Music in Budapest; in 1907 he was appointed professor of piano. Bartok's early compositions were complex and not well received by the public. In 1905 he turned his attention to collecting and cataloging the folk music of his native Hungary. With the help of his friend and fellow Hungarian, composer Zoltan Kodaly, Bartok produced a series of commentaries, anthologies, and arrangements of the folk music that he had collected. Bartok's interest in folk music had a profound effect on his compositions. The influence is seen in the unadorned power of his music, especially in the rhythmic drive of fast movements and in his use of folk melodies, rhythms, and harmonic patterns. Throughout his life, Bartok had to struggle to make a living. Yet he refused to teach musical composition, believing that this would inhibit his own composing. Instead, he earned a living teaching piano and performing. During the 1920s he traveled throughout Europe giving piano recitals, and, in 1927 and 1928, he made a concert tour of the United States. In 1940, after the outbreak of World War II, Bartok left Hungary to settle in the United States, where he continued to perform and compose music. Among his most famous compositions are the Mikrokosmos for piano (1926--27), Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta (1936), and Concerto for Orchestra (1943). Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge became his patron and supported him. Bartok died of leukemia in 1945.

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×