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Vindication of the Rights of Woman

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ISBN-10: 0486290360

ISBN-13: 9780486290362

Edition: 2nd 1996 (Unabridged)

Authors: Mary Wollstonecraft

List price: $5.00
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Book details

List price: $5.00
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 1996
Publisher: Dover Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 7/3/1996
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 224
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.572
Language: English

Mary Wollstonecraft was born in 1759 in Spitalfields, London. After an unsettled childhood, she opened a school following which her first work, Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, was published in 1787. After a stint as a governess in Ireland, she continued to write and published several other works including Mary (1788), A Vindication of the Rights of Men (1790) and her most famous, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). That year she travelled to Paris where she met Gilbert Imlay, by whom she had a daughter, Fanny. Her travels around Scandinavia with her baby daughter in 1795, inspired her travel book Letters Written during a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. On returning to London Imlay's neglect drove her to two suicide attempts. In 1797 she married William Godwin, and had a daughter, the future Mary Shelley. Wollstonecraft died of septicaemia shortly after the birth.

Introduction
Further Reading
A Note on the Text
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
Author's Introduction
Dedication
The Rights and Involved Duties of Mankind Considered
The Prevailing Opinion of a Sexual Character Discussed
The Same Subject Continued
Observations on the State of Degradation to which Woman is Reduced by Various Causes
Animadversions on Some of the Writers Who Have Rendered Women Objects of Pity, Bordering on Contempt
The Effect which an Early Association of Ideas Has upon the Character
Modesty - Comprehensively Considered, and Not as a Sexual Virtue
Morality Undermined by Sexual Notions of the Importance of a Good Reputation
Of the Pernicious Effects which Arise from the Unnatural Distinctions Established in Society
Parental Affection
Duty to Parents
On National Education
Some Instances of the Folly which the Ignorance of Women Generates, with Concluding Reflections on the Moral Improvement that a Revolution in Female Manners Might Naturally Be Expected to Produce