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Bio-Glasses An Introduction

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ISBN-10: 0470711612

ISBN-13: 9780470711613

Edition: 2012

Authors: Julian Jones, Alexis Clare

List price: $80.50
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Description:

This is the first book dedicated to glasses (and their variants) that can be used as biomaterials to repair diseased and damaged tissues. Bio-glasses are superior to other biomaterials in many applications, such as healing bone by signaling stem cells to become bone cells.It covers all types of glasses traditional glasses, bioactive glasses, sol-gel glasses, phosphate glasses, glass-ceramics, composites and hybrids and discusses how they are made, their properties, and the reasons for their use. There are also chapters on their applications, in dentistry, bone regeneration and tissue engineering, and cancer treatment. The final chapter describes the steps needed to take a new material from concept to clinic, covering the essentials of patenting, scale-up, quality assurance, and FDA approval.
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Book details

List price: $80.50
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Limited
Publication date: 7/6/2012
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 254
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.034
Language: English

List of Contributors
Foreword
Preface
The Unique Nature of Glass
What is Glass?
Making Glass
Homogeneity and Phase Separation
Forming
Glasses that are not "Melted"
Exotic Glass
Summary
Further Reading
Melt-Derived Bioactive Glass
Bioglass
Introduction to Bioglass
The Materials Properties of Bioglass
Mechanism of Bioactivity and Effect of Glass Composition
Network Connectivity and Bioactivity
Alternative Bioactive Glass Compositions
In Vitro Studies
In Vivo Studies and Commercial Products
Animal Studies
Human Clinical Studies and Commercial Products
References
Sol-Gel Derived Glasses for Medicine
Introduction
Why Use the Sol-Gel Process?
Sol-Gel Process Principles
Steps in a Typical Sol-Gel Process
Stage 1: Mixing
Stage 2: Casting
Stage 3: Gelation
Stage 4: Ageing
Stage 5: Drying
Stage 6: Stabilisation
Stage 7: Densification
Evolution of Nanoporosity
Making Sol-Gel Monoliths
Making Particles
Sol-Gel Derived Bioactive Glasses
Summary
References
Phosphate Glasses
Introduction
Making Phosphate Glasses
Phosphate Glass Structure
Temperature Behaviour and Crystallisation
Phosphate Glass Dissolution
Cell Compatibility of Glasses
Phosphate Glass Fibres and Composites
Applications
Summary
References
The Structure of Bioactive Glasses and Their Surfaces
Structure of Glasses
Structure of Bioactive Glasses
Computer Modeling (Theoretical Simulation) of Bioactive Glasses
Glass Surfaces
Summary
References
Bioactive Borate Glasses
Introduction
What Differentiaties a Bioactive Borate Glass from Other Bioactive Glasses?
Evaluating Reactive Materials (In Vitro Versus In Vivo Testing)
Multifunctional Bioactive Borate Glasses
Applications of Bioactive Borate Glasses in Orthopedics and Dental Regeneration
Soft Tissue Wound Healing
Tissue/Vessel Guidance
Drug Delivery
Commercial Product Design
Summary
References
Glass-Ceramics
Glass-Ceramics and Their Uses
Methods Used for the Controlled Crystallization of Glasses
A Glass-Ceramic that Hardly Expands When Heated
High-Strength, Moldable Glass-Ceramics for Dental Restoration
Glass-Ceramics that are Moldable and Machinable
Outlook
References
Bioactive Glass and Glass-Ceramic Coatings
Introduction
Enameling
Glazing
Plasma Spraying
Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering Deposition
Pulsed Laser Deposition
Summary
References
Composites Containing Bioactive Glass
Introduction
Biodegradable Polymers
Natural Polymers
Synthetic Polymers
Composite Scaffolds Containing Bioactive Glass
Processing Technologies for Porous Bioactive Composites
Thermally Induced Phase Separation
Solid Freeform Fabrication/Rapid Prototyping
Other Processing Routes
Case Study: the PDLLA-Bioglass Composite Scaffold System
Final Remarks
References
Inorganic-Organic Sol-Gel Hybrids
Introduction
Hybrids in Medicine and Why They Should Be Silica-Based
Self-Assembled Hybrid Films and Layers of Grafted Silanes
Sol-Gel Hybrids
Ormosils
Polymer Choice and Property Control in Hybrids
Silica/Gelatin
Maintaining Bioactivity in Sol-Gel Hybrids
Calcium Incorporation in Sol-Gel Hybrids
Calcium-Containing Ormosils
Ormotites
Hybrids from Vinylsilanes or Other Bifunctional Silances
Summary and Outlook
Further Reading
Dental Applications of Glasses
Introduction
Structure of the Human Tooth
Glass Bioactivity and Teeth
Bioactive Glass in Dental Bone Regeneration
Treatment of Hypersensitive Teeth
Bioactive Glass Coating on Metal Implants
Antimicrobial Properties of Bioactive Glasses
Bioactive Glasses in Polymer Composites
Bioactive Glasses in Glass Ionomer Cements
Summary
References
Bioactive Glass as Synthetic Bone Grafts and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering
Introduction
Synthetic Bone Grafts and Regenerative Medicine
Design Criteria for an Ideal Synthetic Bone Graft
Bioglass and the Complication of Crystallisation During Sintering
Making Porous Glasses
Space Holder Method
Polymer Foam Replication
Direct Foaming
Gel-Cast Foaming
Sol-Gel Foaming Process
Solid Freeform Fabrication
Summary of Bioactive Glass Scaffold Processing
The Future: Porous Hybrids
Bioactive Glasses and Tissue Engineering
Regulatory Issues
Summary
Further Reading
Glasses for Radiotherapy
Introduction
Glass Design and Synthesis
Non-Degradable or Bio-inert Glasses: Rare Earth Aluminosilicate Glasses
Preparation
Properties
Biodegradable Glasses: Rare Earth Borate/Borosilicate Glasses
Design of Radioactive Glass Microspheres for In Vivo Applications
Glass Particle Shape
Useful Radioisotopes
Radiation Dose
Tumor Response and Tailoring of Glass Composition
Treatment of Liver Cancer: Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Treatment of Kidney Cancer: Renal Cell Carcinoma
Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Radiation Synovectomy
Summary
References
Index