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Dao de Jing A Philosophical Translation

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ISBN-10: 0345444191

ISBN-13: 9780345444196

Edition: N/A

Authors: Roger T. Ames, David Hall, Roger Ames

List price: $17.00
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Description:

Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. Ames and David L. Hall bring the timeless wisdom of the Dao de jing into our contemporary world. Though attributed to Laozi, “the Old Master,” the Dao de jing is, in fact, of unknown authorship and may well have…    
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Book details

List price: $17.00
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/30/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 256
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.25" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.660
Language: English

Roger T. Amesis a professor of Chinese philosophy at the University of Hawai’i. He is also editor of the journalPhilosophy East & West. He is the author of several interpretive studies of classical Confucianism, includingThinking Through Confucius(with David L. Hall). His translation ofSun-tzu: The Art of Warfareis recognized as a landmark of contemporary Chinese military and philosophical studies and his translation ofThe Analects ofConfucius(with Henry Rosemont, Jr.) has become a popular classroom text. David L. Hallwas a professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at El Paso. His early research on A. N. Whitehead and American philosophy led him to rethink our understanding…    

Preface and Acknowledgments
Historical Introduction
Historical Context
The Nature and Applications of the Daodejing
Philosophical Introduction: Correlative Cosmology - An Interpretive Context
Optimizing Experience: This Focus and Its Field
Daoist Cosmology: An Interpretive Context
Getting the Most Out of One's Ingredients
Appreciating the Particular
The Mutual Entailing of Opposites
Aesthetic Harmony
Awareness
The Wu [actual symbol not reproducible]-Forms
The Wu [actual symbol not reproducible]-Forms as "Habit-forming"
Glossary of Key Terms
Introduction to the Translation
Translation and Commentary
The Great One Gives Birth to the Waters
Thematic Index
Bibliography of Works Cited
About the Authors