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Consider the Lobster And Other Essays

ISBN-10: 0316013323

ISBN-13: 9780316013321

Edition: N/A

Authors: David Foster Wallace

List price: $16.00
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Description:

Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a funny bone? What is John Updike's deal, anyway? And what happens when adult video starlets meet their fans in person? David Foster Wallace answers these questions and more in essays that are also enthralling narrative adventures. Whether covering the three-ring circus of a vicious presidential race, plunging into the wars between dictionary writers, or confronting the World's Largest Lobster Cooker at the annual Maine Lobster Festival, Wallace projects a quality of thought that is uniquely his and a voice as powerful and distinct as any in American letters.
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Book details

List price: $16.00
Publisher: Little Brown & Company
Publication date: 7/2/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 352
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 0.902
Language: English

Writer David Foster Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York on February 21, 1962. He received a B.A. from Amherst College in Massachusetts. He was working on his master's degree in creative writing at the University of Arizona when he published his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987). Wallace published his second novel Infinite Jest (1996) which introduced a cast of characters that included recovering alcoholics, foreign statesmen, residents of a halfway house, and high-school tennis stars. He spent four years researching and writing this novel. His first collection of short stories was Girl with Curious Hair (1989). He also published a nonfiction work titled Signifying Rappers: Rap and Race in the Urban Present. He committed suicide on September 12, 2008 at the age of 46 after suffering with bouts of depression for 20 years.

Big Red Son
Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think
Some Remarks on Kafka's Funniness from Which Probably Not Enough Has Been Removed
Authority and American Usage
The View from Mrs. Thompson's
How Tracy Austin Broke My Heart
Up, Simba
Consider the Lobster
Joseph Frank's Dostoevsky
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