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Archaeological Study of Rural Capitalism and Material Life The Gibbs Farmstead in Southern Appalachia, 1790-1920

ISBN-10: 0306477734

ISBN-13: 9780306477737

Edition: 2003

Authors: Mark D. Groover

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Description:

Quickly vanishing in our own time, less than a century ago family-operated farms were a predominant way of life in North America. Since the 1600s the agriculture practiced on American farms has been a catalyst of both geographic settlement and economic expansion. During the 19th century, four generations of the Nicholas Gibbs family operated a successful farm in Knox County, East Tennessee. In this book, archaeology and historical information are combined with strands of thought in world systems theory and the Annales school of French social history to explore the influence of rural capitalism upon everyday life and material conditions at a Southern Appalachian farmstead. Focusing upon the domestic landscape, architecture, and household items, consideration of material life reveals the presence of a substantial folk orientation among the Gibbs family that was also significantly influenced by larger trends within national-level consumerism and popular culture. An Archaeological Study of Rural Capitalism and Material Life will be of interest to historical archaeologists, cultural anthropologists, social historians, and historical sociologists, especially researchers studying the influence of globalization and economic development upon rural regions like Appalachia.
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Book details

Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Springer
Publication date: 4/30/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 322
Size: 6.00" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.232
Language: English

Theory, Methods, and Historical Context
Introduction
Interpretive Theory and Methods
World Systems Theory
Temporal Scales and Household Dynamics
Braudel and the Annales School
Family Cycles and Household Succession
Linking Interpretive Theory to the Material Record
History of the Nicholas Gibbs Extended Family
The Nicholas Gibbs Family and Farmstead
From the Palatinate to Pennsylvania, 1733-1760s
The Nicholas Gibbs Household in North Carolina, 1760s-1791
The Nicholas Gibbs Household in Knox County, 1792-1817
The Daniel Gibbs Household, 1817-1852
The Rufus Gibbs Household, 1852-1905
The John Gibbs Household, 1905-1913
The Tenant Period, 1913-1986
The Nicholas Gibbs Historical Society, 1986-Present
Household Cycles for the Gibbs Family, 1764-1913
Summary of Household Succession
The Gibbs Farmstead: Agricultural Production and Economic Strategies
Appalachia's Ridge and Valley Province: Physical and Cultural Geography
Infrastructure Development in the Study Area
Diachronic Trends in Land Ownership
Information Sources and Analysis Methods
Rural Infilling
Disparity in Land Ownership
Agricultural Production Trends: A Diachronic Analysis
The South
East Tennessee and Knox County
The Gibbs Farmstead
Recovering Mind: Identifying Subsistence and Surplus Producers
Archaeology and Material Life
Archaeological Investigations at the Gibbs Site
Field Research Design
Site Excavation Areas
Identifying Continuity and Change in the Domestic Landscape
Diachronic Trends: Midden and Maintenance Decline
Households and Archaeological Features
Domestic Architecture, Landscape Change, and Household Succession
Regional and National Architectural Trends
Diachronic Trends in Consumerism and the Standard of Living
The Development of Consumerism
Consumerism and Newspaper Advertisements
The Standard of Living: Probate Inventory Analysis
Summary
Time Sequence Analysis: Exploring Household Dynamics
Functional Analysis
Time Sequence Analysis
Systematic Site Survey and Testing
The Total Artifact Assemblage
Sheet Midden
Feature 16, The Smokehouse Pit Cellar
Summary
Foodways Among the Gibbs Family
Diet and Faunal Remains
Ceramics and Foodways
Minimum Vessel Analysis
Time Sequence Analysis
Ceramic Use by Households
The Redware Assemblage
Development of Redware Potteries in East Tennessee
Redware Analysis Results
Summary
A Southern Appalachian Farm Family Reconsidered
Agricultural Production Information
Probate Inventory Analysis Information
Artifact Analysis Information
References
Index