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Information Society and the Black Community

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ISBN-10: 0275957241

ISBN-13: 9780275957247

Edition: 2001

Authors: John T. Barber, Alice A. Tait

List price: $84.00
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Description:

Does the Information Age promise egalitarianism and democracy, or will it simply reinforce long-standing social and economic inequalities? This collection of essays analyzes the emerging role of African-Americans in post-industrial society from a variety of communications research perspectives. Accepting W.J. Wilson's theory of a socially and economically isolated African-American underclass, Barber and Tait ask the logical question: what next? The Information Society and the Black Community is a critical examination of the prospects and pitfalls of a historically disadvantaged group in a period of rapid technological advances and economic growth. Adopting Frank Websters theory of the Information Society as a framework for organization and development, the book is divided into five sections that look at technological, economic, occupational, spatial, and cultural aspects of the relationship between the African-American community and the Information Society. Part One analyzes data on African-American use of information technology, and examines how the new flow of information might effect African-American social and cultural images. Part Two focuses on African-American participation in the ownership and control of information industries. Part Three treats professional training and employment patterns affecting African-Americans in the Information Age. Part Four centers around the potential uses of information technology in solving social, political, and economic problems. Part Five addresses the growing connections of the African-American community to Africa and the rest of the world via information technology.
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Book details

List price: $84.00
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: ABC-CLIO, LLC
Publication date: 11/30/2000
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 296
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.75" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.430
Language: English

JOHN T. BARBER is a Human Resources Development Specialist with the Broadcasting Board of Governors at the International Broadcasting Bureau in Washington, D.C. The IBB comprises the Voice of America, WORLDNET Television and Film Service, the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, Radio Free Europe, Radio Free Asia, and Middle Eastern Radio Network. The BBG is the independent, autonomous entity responsible for all U.S. government and government-sponsored, nonmilitary international broadcasting. The BGA/IBB is the former U.S. Information Agency, which had been under the auspices of the State Department until 1999.

Introduction
The Technological Dimension More Than You Think: African Americans On The World Wide Web
Information Technology
African Americans and Privacy: Understanding the Black Perspective in the Emerging Policy Debate
The Economic Dimension Technology and African American Newspapers: Implications for Survival and Change
FCC Policy and the Underdevelopment of Black Entrepreneurship
The New Model of Black Media Entrepreneurship: BET Holdings, Inc.
A New Spectrum of Business: African Americans and Wireless Telephony
The Occupational Dimension Telecommunications Training: An Academic Perspective
Information Labor and African Americans
The Spatial Dimension Race and the Information Superhighway: Implications for Participatory Democracy in the 21st Century
Taft Broome Race, Politics, and Pedagogy of New Media: from Civil Rights to Cyber Rights
The Cultural Dimension Afrocentric Information Content: Historical Development and Economic Opportunities
Old Voices, New Drums: Black News and Information On-line
Black Connections and Disconnections in the Global Information Supermarket
Is Black America an Information Community?