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Identity and the Natural Environment The Psychological Significance of Nature

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ISBN-10: 0262033119

ISBN-13: 9780262033114

Edition: 2004

Authors: Susan Clayton, Susan Opotow

List price: $16.75
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Description:

The often impassioned nature of environmental conflicts can be attributed to the fact that they are bound up with our sense of personal and social identity. Environmental identity -- how we orient ourselves to the natural world -- leads us to personalize abstract global issues and take action (or not) according to our sense of who we are. We may know about the greenhouse effect -- but can we give up our SUV for a more fuel-efficient car? Understanding this psychological connection can lead to more effective pro-environmental policymaking. Identity and the Natural Environmentexamines the ways in which our sense of who we are affects our relationship with nature, and vice versa. This book brings together cutting-edge work on the topic of identity and the environment, sampling the variety and energy of this emerging field but also placing it within a descriptive framework. These theory-based, empirical studies locate environmental identity on a continuum of social influence, and the book is divided into three sections reflecting minimal, moderate, or strong social influence. Throughout, the contributors focus on the interplay between social and environmental forces; as one local activist says, "We don't know if we're organizing communities to plant trees, or planting trees to organize communities."
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Book details

List price: $16.75
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 11/21/2003
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 368
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

#60;b#62;Susan Clayton#60;/b#62; is a professor of social psychology at the College of Wooster. Her research aims to understand the ways in which people relate to nature, as well as to investigate broader issues of identity and justice. She is a past president of the Society for Population and Environmental Psychology.#60;br#62;#60;p#62;#60;b#62;Olin Eugene (Gene) Myers Jr.#60;/b#62; is Associate Professor at Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University, where he offers courses in conservation psychology, human ecology, environmental ethics, and is extensively involved in undergraduate and graduate programs in environmental education. His research interests are wide-ranging and include psychology and anthrozoology as applied to conservation.

Susan Opotow is Professor in the Graduate Program in Dispute Resolution at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Identity and the Natural Environment
Some Lives and Some Theories
Experiencing Nature as Individuals
Environmental Identity: A Conceptual and an Operational Definition
Human Identity in Relation to Wild Black Bears: A Natural-Social Ecology of Subjective Creatures
Moralizing Trees: Anthropomorphism and Identity in Children's Relationships to Nature
The Development of Environmental Moral Identity
Children's Environmental Identity: Indicators and Behavioral Impacts
Experiencing Nature in Social and Community Contexts
The Human Self and the Animal Other: Exploring Borderland Identities
Trees and Human Identity
Identity, Involvement, and Expertise in the Inner City: Some Benefits of Tree-Planting Projects
Representations of the Local Environment as Threatened by Global Climate Change: Toward a Contextualized Analysis of Environmental Identity in a Coastal Area
Experiencing Nature as Members of Social Groups
Identity and Exclusion in Rangeland Conflict
Group Identity and Stakeholder Conflict in Water Resource Management
Constructing and Maintaining Ecological Identities: The Strategies of Deep Ecologists
Identity and Sustained Environmental Practice
About the Contributors
Index